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Vol 6, No 5 (2010)
Review paper
Published online: 2011-01-19
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Pathophysiological basis for therapy targeted on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition

Marek Z. Wojtukiewicz, Ewa Sierko, Paweł Szambora
Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(5):217-227.

open access

Vol 6, No 5 (2010)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2011-01-19

Abstract

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) belongs to the group of tyrosine kinase receptors, i.e. ErbB family. The receptor consists of three regions: an extracellular ligand-binding region, an intracellular region and a transmembrane domain which anchors the molecule in the cell membrane. The intracellular domain is responsible for tyrosine kinase activity and EGFR regulatory functions. EGFR overexpression is observed on the surface of the neoplastic cells of many cancer types. It is associated with clinical stage of the tumor and facilitates cancer invasion. EGFR overexpression is a negative prognostic factor. After ligand binding and receptors dimerization and activation, EGFR elicits cell responses through multiple divergent pathways. EGFR stimulation results in increased cell proliferation, enhanced invasion, distant metastases formation, increased angiogenesis, decreased apoptosis, prolonged cancer cell survival and, in consequence, cancer progression.

Onkol. Prak. Klin. 2010; 6, 5: 217–227

Abstract

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) belongs to the group of tyrosine kinase receptors, i.e. ErbB family. The receptor consists of three regions: an extracellular ligand-binding region, an intracellular region and a transmembrane domain which anchors the molecule in the cell membrane. The intracellular domain is responsible for tyrosine kinase activity and EGFR regulatory functions. EGFR overexpression is observed on the surface of the neoplastic cells of many cancer types. It is associated with clinical stage of the tumor and facilitates cancer invasion. EGFR overexpression is a negative prognostic factor. After ligand binding and receptors dimerization and activation, EGFR elicits cell responses through multiple divergent pathways. EGFR stimulation results in increased cell proliferation, enhanced invasion, distant metastases formation, increased angiogenesis, decreased apoptosis, prolonged cancer cell survival and, in consequence, cancer progression.

Onkol. Prak. Klin. 2010; 6, 5: 217–227

Get Citation

Keywords

epidermal growth factor receptor; cross-talk; cross-phosphorylation; autocrine switch; dimerization; heterodimerization

About this article
Title

Pathophysiological basis for therapy targeted on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 6, No 5 (2010)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

217-227

Published online

2011-01-19

Bibliographic record

Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(5):217-227.

Keywords

epidermal growth factor receptor
cross-talk
cross-phosphorylation
autocrine switch
dimerization
heterodimerization

Authors

Marek Z. Wojtukiewicz
Ewa Sierko
Paweł Szambora

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