open access

Vol 15, No 2 (2019)
Case report
Published online: 2019-05-17
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The effectiveness of chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer patients with BRCA2 gene mutation and Schwartz-Bartter syndrome

Małgorzata Flis, Paweł Krawczyk, Izabella Drogoń, Katarzyna Kurek, Robert Kieszko, Janusz Milanowski
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2019.0008
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2019;15(2):120-123.

open access

Vol 15, No 2 (2019)
CASE REPORT
Published online: 2019-05-17

Abstract

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) currently comprises 15–20% of all lung cancers. It is characterised by rapid growth and early appearance of distant metastases. It is closely related to smoking. A characteristic feature of this type of cancer is the frequent coexistence of paraneoplastic syndromes (about 50% of patients). Paraneoplastic syndromes are clinically important because they can be the first sign of cancer. Early diagnosis of disturbing symptoms is an important factor in increasing the effectiveness of treatment and the patient’s chance for longer survival. The most frequent and important paraneoplastic syndromes in the course of SCLC are primarily the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion (SIADH), paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, and Lambert-Eaton syndrome. This paper presents the case of a patient who came to the hospital with symptoms of hyponatraemia. Looking for the causes of hyponatraemia, the syndrome of abnormal secretion of antidiuretic hormone (Schwartz-Bartter syndrome) in the course of small cell lung cancer was confirmed. The fact that the patient was genetically burdened with the family history of breast cancer and was a carrier of the BRCA2 gene mutation was also significant. According to the latest research, mutation in the BRCA2 gene significantly affects the chemosensitivity of cancer cells, and thus increases the body’s response to treatment. The patient received chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide, resulting in partial remission of cancer after two treatment cycles.

Abstract

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) currently comprises 15–20% of all lung cancers. It is characterised by rapid growth and early appearance of distant metastases. It is closely related to smoking. A characteristic feature of this type of cancer is the frequent coexistence of paraneoplastic syndromes (about 50% of patients). Paraneoplastic syndromes are clinically important because they can be the first sign of cancer. Early diagnosis of disturbing symptoms is an important factor in increasing the effectiveness of treatment and the patient’s chance for longer survival. The most frequent and important paraneoplastic syndromes in the course of SCLC are primarily the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion (SIADH), paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, and Lambert-Eaton syndrome. This paper presents the case of a patient who came to the hospital with symptoms of hyponatraemia. Looking for the causes of hyponatraemia, the syndrome of abnormal secretion of antidiuretic hormone (Schwartz-Bartter syndrome) in the course of small cell lung cancer was confirmed. The fact that the patient was genetically burdened with the family history of breast cancer and was a carrier of the BRCA2 gene mutation was also significant. According to the latest research, mutation in the BRCA2 gene significantly affects the chemosensitivity of cancer cells, and thus increases the body’s response to treatment. The patient received chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide, resulting in partial remission of cancer after two treatment cycles.
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Keywords

small cell lung cancer; BRCA2 mutation; Schwartz-Bartter syndrome

Supp./Additional Files (5)
Ryc1. Zdjęcie przeglądowe klatki piersiowej wykonane w marcu 2018 r. Nie stwierdzono nieprawidłowości.
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Ryc.2. Zmiany naciekowe płuca prawego (kwiecień 2018)
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Ryc.3. Pakiet węzłów chłonnych z rozpadem (kwiecień 2018)
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Ryc.4 Regresja zmian naciekowych płuca prawego (czerwiec 2018)
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Ryc.5 Regresja zmian węzłowych śródpiersia (czerwiec 2018)
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About this article
Title

The effectiveness of chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer patients with BRCA2 gene mutation and Schwartz-Bartter syndrome

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 15, No 2 (2019)

Article type

Case report

Pages

120-123

Published online

2019-05-17

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2019.0008

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2019;15(2):120-123.

Keywords

small cell lung cancer
BRCA2 mutation
Schwartz-Bartter syndrome

Authors

Małgorzata Flis
Paweł Krawczyk
Izabella Drogoń
Katarzyna Kurek
Robert Kieszko
Janusz Milanowski

References (6)
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  4. Yang Da, Khan S, Sun Y, et al. Association of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with survival, chemotherapy sensitivity, and gene mutator phenotype in patients with ovarian cancer. JAMA. 2011; 306(14): 1557–1565.
  5. Xia F, Taghian DG, DeFrank JS, et al. Deficiency of human BRCA2 leads to impaired homologous recombination but maintains normal nonhomologous end joining. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001; 98(15): 8644–8649.
  6. Petrucelli N, Daly MB, Feldman GL. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer due to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Genet Med. 2010; 12(5): 245–259.

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