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Vol 14, No 2 (2018)
Review paper
Published online: 2018-04-26
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BRAF — a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer

Paweł Potocki, Piotr J Wysocki
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2018.0013
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2018;14(2):86-95.

open access

Vol 14, No 2 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-04-26

Abstract

The BRAF V600E mutation, already a well-established biomarker in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, has been extensively studied in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in recent years. It was revealed that this mutation occurs in about 10% of CRC patients. It has been proven to be a negative prognostic factor, although more recent studies indicate a complex association of this effect with the state of genes responsible for the repair of “mismatch” DNA damage. Although the predictive value of the BRAF V600E mutation for chemotherapy and targeted treatment remains the subject of controversy, the guidelines of international scientific societies highlight the need for a different approach to systemic treatment of patients in this population. Numerous treatment options are currently evaluated: from the intensification of the classic chemotherapy regimens administered in the first-line setting to the innovative combinations of targeted drugs aimed at eliminating the influence of BRAF V600E mutation on signal transduction pathways that are crucial for carcinogenesis. The following review is intended to bring this complex topic to the attention of oncologists who deal with the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer in clinical practice.

Abstract

The BRAF V600E mutation, already a well-established biomarker in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, has been extensively studied in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in recent years. It was revealed that this mutation occurs in about 10% of CRC patients. It has been proven to be a negative prognostic factor, although more recent studies indicate a complex association of this effect with the state of genes responsible for the repair of “mismatch” DNA damage. Although the predictive value of the BRAF V600E mutation for chemotherapy and targeted treatment remains the subject of controversy, the guidelines of international scientific societies highlight the need for a different approach to systemic treatment of patients in this population. Numerous treatment options are currently evaluated: from the intensification of the classic chemotherapy regimens administered in the first-line setting to the innovative combinations of targeted drugs aimed at eliminating the influence of BRAF V600E mutation on signal transduction pathways that are crucial for carcinogenesis. The following review is intended to bring this complex topic to the attention of oncologists who deal with the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer in clinical practice.

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Keywords

colorectal cancer, BRAF, V600E, FOLFOXIRI

About this article
Title

BRAF — a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 14, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

86-95

Published online

2018-04-26

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2018.0013

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2018;14(2):86-95.

Keywords

colorectal cancer
BRAF
V600E
FOLFOXIRI

Authors

Paweł Potocki
Piotr J Wysocki

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