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Vol 13, No 6 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2018-01-04
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Clinical use of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors in patients with breast cancer — literature review

Sylwia Dębska-Szmich, Piotr Potemski
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2017.0034
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2017;13(6):281-294.

open access

Vol 13, No 6 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-04

Abstract

Luminal subtype predominates in patients diagnosed with breast cancer — the incidence in developed countries is up to 80% of all cases. Hormonal therapy is an important part of the treatment; this is used as adjuvant treatment after radical surgery, and is also the preferred option of palliative systemic treatment. Unfortunately, during adjuvant hormonal treatment as well as palliative therapy, primary or secondary resistance may appear. To prevent and overcome these phenomena a strategy of combined pharmacological treatment was developed. In many clinical trials the effectiveness of doublets composed of hormonal and molecularly targeted drugs was assessed. So far, combination of hormonal therapy with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 inhibitors appears to be the most successful. Such a combination used in the first or further lines of palliative treatment prolongs progression-free survival. Moreover, its toxicity is relatively low and manageable. Until now, three drugs have been approved for treatment of breast cancer: palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib. This review describes the mechanism of action of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 inhibitors and summarises the most relevant trials, which have become the basis of these drugs’ approval.

Abstract

Luminal subtype predominates in patients diagnosed with breast cancer — the incidence in developed countries is up to 80% of all cases. Hormonal therapy is an important part of the treatment; this is used as adjuvant treatment after radical surgery, and is also the preferred option of palliative systemic treatment. Unfortunately, during adjuvant hormonal treatment as well as palliative therapy, primary or secondary resistance may appear. To prevent and overcome these phenomena a strategy of combined pharmacological treatment was developed. In many clinical trials the effectiveness of doublets composed of hormonal and molecularly targeted drugs was assessed. So far, combination of hormonal therapy with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 inhibitors appears to be the most successful. Such a combination used in the first or further lines of palliative treatment prolongs progression-free survival. Moreover, its toxicity is relatively low and manageable. Until now, three drugs have been approved for treatment of breast cancer: palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib. This review describes the mechanism of action of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 inhibitors and summarises the most relevant trials, which have become the basis of these drugs’ approval.
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Keywords

CDK 4 and 6 inhibitors, palbociclib, ribociclib, abemaciclib, hormone therapy, breast cancer, cyclin-dependent kinase

About this article
Title

Clinical use of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors in patients with breast cancer — literature review

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 13, No 6 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

281-294

Published online

2018-01-04

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2017.0034

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2017;13(6):281-294.

Keywords

CDK 4 and 6 inhibitors
palbociclib
ribociclib
abemaciclib
hormone therapy
breast cancer
cyclin-dependent kinase

Authors

Sylwia Dębska-Szmich
Piotr Potemski

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