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Vol 13, No 2 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2017-08-25
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Cardiovascular complications of antiangiogenic therapy in ovarian cancer patients

Michał Wilk, Sebastian Szmit
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2017.0008
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2017;13(2):49-56.

open access

Vol 13, No 2 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2017-08-25

Abstract

Therapy with angiogenesis inhibitors carries the risk for health and life-threatening cardio-vascular complications. The most common include the development of arterial hypertension, thromboembolic events (venous and arterial) and bleeding. This study provides a detailed analysis of their incidence, pathomechanisms as well as methods of prophylaxis and treatment among ovarian cancer patients receiving bevacizumab.

Abstract

Therapy with angiogenesis inhibitors carries the risk for health and life-threatening cardio-vascular complications. The most common include the development of arterial hypertension, thromboembolic events (venous and arterial) and bleeding. This study provides a detailed analysis of their incidence, pathomechanisms as well as methods of prophylaxis and treatment among ovarian cancer patients receiving bevacizumab.

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Keywords

anti-angiogenic drugs, bevacizumab, cardiotoxicity, ovarian cancer

About this article
Title

Cardiovascular complications of antiangiogenic therapy in ovarian cancer patients

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 13, No 2 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

49-56

Published online

2017-08-25

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2017.0008

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2017;13(2):49-56.

Keywords

anti-angiogenic drugs
bevacizumab
cardiotoxicity
ovarian cancer

Authors

Michał Wilk
Sebastian Szmit

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