open access

Vol 12, No 4 (2016)
Review paper
Published online: 2016-12-22
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Bevacizumab — cardiovascular side effects in daily practice

Tomasz Lewandowski, Sebastian Szmit
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2016.0003
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2016;12(4):136-143.

open access

Vol 12, No 4 (2016)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-12-22

Abstract

The formation of new blood vessels is essential for tumour growth and metastasis. Bevacizumab, monoclonal antibody binding VEGF, is applicable in the therapy of several metastatic cancer diseases. This direct interference in the mechanisms of angiogenesis results in certain cardiovascular complications such as arterial hypertension, venous and arterial thromboembolic events, and heart failure. Knowledge of risk factors, early diagnosis, and treatment seem to be crucial for the prognosis of patients. This article presents the problem of cardiovascular side effects related to bevacizumab with some selected recommendations of international experts and the Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology.

Abstract

The formation of new blood vessels is essential for tumour growth and metastasis. Bevacizumab, monoclonal antibody binding VEGF, is applicable in the therapy of several metastatic cancer diseases. This direct interference in the mechanisms of angiogenesis results in certain cardiovascular complications such as arterial hypertension, venous and arterial thromboembolic events, and heart failure. Knowledge of risk factors, early diagnosis, and treatment seem to be crucial for the prognosis of patients. This article presents the problem of cardiovascular side effects related to bevacizumab with some selected recommendations of international experts and the Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology.

Get Citation

Keywords

bevacizumab, angiogenesis, arterial hypertension, venous and arterial thromboembolic events

About this article
Title

Bevacizumab — cardiovascular side effects in daily practice

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 12, No 4 (2016)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

136-143

Published online

2016-12-22

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2016.0003

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2016;12(4):136-143.

Keywords

bevacizumab
angiogenesis
arterial hypertension
venous and arterial thromboembolic events

Authors

Tomasz Lewandowski
Sebastian Szmit

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