open access

Vol 12, No 4 (2016)
Review paper
Published online: 2016-12-22
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The use of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with solid tumours — when and to whom?

Joanna Kardas, Agnieszka Buraczewska
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2016.0005
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2016;12(4):128-135.

open access

Vol 12, No 4 (2016)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-12-22

Abstract

Cancer patients treated due to solid tumours are exposed to bacterial, fungal, and viral infections, and the high morbidity connected to them is caused by cancer itself and anticancer therapy. Systemic chemotherapy and local treatment, e.g. surgery and/or radiotherapy, can contribute to infectious complication, which have a negative impact on the efficacy of the treatment and patients’ quality of life. Therefore, there is a need to look for prevention methods, and antibiotics might be one of the options. Since granulocyte colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) appeared, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis was limited to a few indications. In patients with afebrile neutropaenia the use of antimicrobial therapy should be considered only when coexisting risk factors exist. There are also certain situations in cancer therapy when antibiotic prophylaxis could be useful. The presented publication is aimed to identify situations when the treating clinician should consider antibiotic prophylaxis in a patient with a solid tumour.

Abstract

Cancer patients treated due to solid tumours are exposed to bacterial, fungal, and viral infections, and the high morbidity connected to them is caused by cancer itself and anticancer therapy. Systemic chemotherapy and local treatment, e.g. surgery and/or radiotherapy, can contribute to infectious complication, which have a negative impact on the efficacy of the treatment and patients’ quality of life. Therefore, there is a need to look for prevention methods, and antibiotics might be one of the options. Since granulocyte colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) appeared, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis was limited to a few indications. In patients with afebrile neutropaenia the use of antimicrobial therapy should be considered only when coexisting risk factors exist. There are also certain situations in cancer therapy when antibiotic prophylaxis could be useful. The presented publication is aimed to identify situations when the treating clinician should consider antibiotic prophylaxis in a patient with a solid tumour.

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Keywords

antibiotic therapy, prophylaxis, chemotherapy, G-CSF, solid tumour

About this article
Title

The use of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with solid tumours — when and to whom?

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 12, No 4 (2016)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

128-135

Published online

2016-12-22

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2016.0005

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2016;12(4):128-135.

Keywords

antibiotic therapy
prophylaxis
chemotherapy
G-CSF
solid tumour

Authors

Joanna Kardas
Agnieszka Buraczewska

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