open access

Vol 22, No 2 (2019)
Original articles
Published online: 2019-06-05
Submitted: 2018-12-18
Accepted: 2019-06-04
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Three-compartment pharmacokinetic models of radiotracers used in the GFR-determination — estimation of their parameters using the time-concentration curves

Cyprian Świętaszczyk, Lars Jødal
DOI: 10.5603/NMR.a2019.0014
·
Pubmed: 31482558
·
Nucl. Med. Rev 2019;22(2):60-68.

open access

Vol 22, No 2 (2019)
Original articles
Published online: 2019-06-05
Submitted: 2018-12-18
Accepted: 2019-06-04

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In GFR measurements with radiotracers, there is evidence that a two-compartment model is unable to describe the full plasma curve, including early time points, but analyses generally focus on two-compartment models.

AIMS: To analyze both the mammillary and catenary three-compartment model and to determine empirical relations between model constants and the overall GFR and ECV (extra-cellular volume).

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mathematical analysis of the three-compartment model. Full-curve patient data from 32 adults and 7 children were used to relate model parameters to GFR and ECV.

RESULTS: Model volumes were found to be roughly proportional to ECV. In both models, the central (plasma) volume was V1 = 0.24 × ECV and elimination rate from V1 was k10 = 4.2 × GFR/ECV. In the mammillary model, the two parallel volumes were V2 = 0.28 × ECV, V3 = 0.48 × ECV, and intercompartmental clearances were Cl12 [mL/min] = 0.0058 × ECV [mL], Cl13 = 0.042 × ECV. In the catenary model, the serial volumes were V2 = 0.60 × ECV, V3 = 0.16 × ECV, with clearances Cl12 = 0.048 × ECV, Cl23 = 0.0036 × ECV.

CONCLUSION: Insight into the three-compartment model was achieved, and empirical relations to ECV and GFR/ECV were determined.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In GFR measurements with radiotracers, there is evidence that a two-compartment model is unable to describe the full plasma curve, including early time points, but analyses generally focus on two-compartment models.

AIMS: To analyze both the mammillary and catenary three-compartment model and to determine empirical relations between model constants and the overall GFR and ECV (extra-cellular volume).

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Mathematical analysis of the three-compartment model. Full-curve patient data from 32 adults and 7 children were used to relate model parameters to GFR and ECV.

RESULTS: Model volumes were found to be roughly proportional to ECV. In both models, the central (plasma) volume was V1 = 0.24 × ECV and elimination rate from V1 was k10 = 4.2 × GFR/ECV. In the mammillary model, the two parallel volumes were V2 = 0.28 × ECV, V3 = 0.48 × ECV, and intercompartmental clearances were Cl12 [mL/min] = 0.0058 × ECV [mL], Cl13 = 0.042 × ECV. In the catenary model, the serial volumes were V2 = 0.60 × ECV, V3 = 0.16 × ECV, with clearances Cl12 = 0.048 × ECV, Cl23 = 0.0036 × ECV.

CONCLUSION: Insight into the three-compartment model was achieved, and empirical relations to ECV and GFR/ECV were determined.

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Keywords

GFR-determination; pharmacokinetics; compartment model; Tc-99m-DTPA

About this article
Title

Three-compartment pharmacokinetic models of radiotracers used in the GFR-determination — estimation of their parameters using the time-concentration curves

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 22, No 2 (2019)

Pages

60-68

Published online

2019-06-05

DOI

10.5603/NMR.a2019.0014

Pubmed

31482558

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2019;22(2):60-68.

Keywords

GFR-determination
pharmacokinetics
compartment model
Tc-99m-DTPA

Authors

Cyprian Świętaszczyk
Lars Jødal

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