open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2019)
Clinical vignette
Published online: 2019-01-31
Submitted: 2018-07-30
Accepted: 2018-11-29
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Incidental detection of Os acromiale mimicking a fracture on 18F-Fluoride PET-CT

Vincenzo Militano, Mark Hughes, Sobhan Vinjamuri, Nagabhushan Seshadri
DOI: 10.5603/NMR.2019.0009
·
Nucl. Med. Rev 2019;22(1):43-44.

open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2019)
Clinical vignette
Published online: 2019-01-31
Submitted: 2018-07-30
Accepted: 2018-11-29

Abstract

Os acromiale represents an unfused accessory centre of ossification of the acromion of scapula. It may cause shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tear or degenerative acromio-clavicular joint disease. A 38-year-old male with history of degenerative disc disease presented with persistent backache. MRI of the lumbar spine had earlier showed left paracentral disc protrusion of L5/S1 vertebrae impinging the left S1 nerve root for which the patient underwent fluoroscopic guided nerve root block. Due to persistent bilateral sciatica and worsening leg pain a decompression surgery was planned. A bone scan was requested to exclude other causes of pain prior to surgery for which the patient underwent 18F- Fluoride PET-CT examination. We report a case of incidental detection of Os acromiale mimicking fracture. As the management strategy for both is quite different this case highlights the importance of correct recognition of this identity for appropriate management.

Abstract

Os acromiale represents an unfused accessory centre of ossification of the acromion of scapula. It may cause shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tear or degenerative acromio-clavicular joint disease. A 38-year-old male with history of degenerative disc disease presented with persistent backache. MRI of the lumbar spine had earlier showed left paracentral disc protrusion of L5/S1 vertebrae impinging the left S1 nerve root for which the patient underwent fluoroscopic guided nerve root block. Due to persistent bilateral sciatica and worsening leg pain a decompression surgery was planned. A bone scan was requested to exclude other causes of pain prior to surgery for which the patient underwent 18F- Fluoride PET-CT examination. We report a case of incidental detection of Os acromiale mimicking fracture. As the management strategy for both is quite different this case highlights the importance of correct recognition of this identity for appropriate management.

Get Citation

Keywords

18F-Fluoride, PET/CT, Os acromiale.

About this article
Title

Incidental detection of Os acromiale mimicking a fracture on 18F-Fluoride PET-CT

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 22, No 1 (2019)

Pages

43-44

Published online

2019-01-31

DOI

10.5603/NMR.2019.0009

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2019;22(1):43-44.

Keywords

18F-Fluoride
PET/CT
Os acromiale.

Authors

Vincenzo Militano
Mark Hughes
Sobhan Vinjamuri
Nagabhushan Seshadri

References (8)
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  6. Harris JD, Griesser MJ, Jones GL. Systematic review of the surgical treatment for symptomatic os acromiale. Int J Shoulder Surg. 2011; 5(1): 9–16.
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  8. Swain RA, Wilson FD, Harsha DM. The os acromiale: another cause of impingement. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1996; 28(12): 1459–1462.

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