open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2019)
Clinical vignette
Published online: 2019-01-31
Submitted: 2018-11-03
Accepted: 2018-11-29
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Multiple photopenic vertebrae in the bone scintigraphy of a young man with Gorham disease: CT and MRI correlation

Ramin Sadeghi, Sara Shakeri, Toktam Massoudi, Fatemeh Farahmandfar, Farnaz Nesari Javan
DOI: 10.5603/NMR.2019.0008
·
Nucl. Med. Rev 2019;22(1):40-42.

open access

Vol 22, No 1 (2019)
Clinical vignette
Published online: 2019-01-31
Submitted: 2018-11-03
Accepted: 2018-11-29

Abstract

We report a rare pattern of extensive bone abnormalities on the Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy in a patient with Gorham disease. This rare condition is the result of vascular and lymphatic channel proliferation in bony structures which induce bone resorption. Our case is a 28-year-old man with a history of biopsy-proven soft tissue hemangioma in the left thigh, encountered with a recent diagnosis of multiple vertebral hemangiomata in the axial skeleton and progressive bony destructions in the pelvis on CT and MRI images, referred for bone scintigraphy. Multiple photopenic hemangiomata were noted on bone scan.

Abstract

We report a rare pattern of extensive bone abnormalities on the Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy in a patient with Gorham disease. This rare condition is the result of vascular and lymphatic channel proliferation in bony structures which induce bone resorption. Our case is a 28-year-old man with a history of biopsy-proven soft tissue hemangioma in the left thigh, encountered with a recent diagnosis of multiple vertebral hemangiomata in the axial skeleton and progressive bony destructions in the pelvis on CT and MRI images, referred for bone scintigraphy. Multiple photopenic hemangiomata were noted on bone scan.

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Keywords

Gorham disease; Bone resorption; Vascular proliferation; Hemangioma

About this article
Title

Multiple photopenic vertebrae in the bone scintigraphy of a young man with Gorham disease: CT and MRI correlation

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 22, No 1 (2019)

Pages

40-42

Published online

2019-01-31

DOI

10.5603/NMR.2019.0008

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2019;22(1):40-42.

Keywords

Gorham disease
Bone resorption
Vascular proliferation
Hemangioma

Authors

Ramin Sadeghi
Sara Shakeri
Toktam Massoudi
Fatemeh Farahmandfar
Farnaz Nesari Javan

References (11)
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