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Vol 8, No 2 (2005)
Published online: 2005-06-23
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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Bone turnover markers and bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of the skeletal metastases

Beata E. Chrapko, Anna Nocuń, Renata Gołębiewska, Helena Jankowska, Janina Zaorska-Rajca
Nucl. Med. Rev 2005;8(2):100-104.

open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2005)
Published online: 2005-06-23
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was evaluation of the clinical usefulness of bone scintigraphy and of serum bone turnover marker levels in the assessment of skeletal metastases.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated 60 patients with suspected skeletal metastases. Serum level of bone-formation marker: amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP) and a bone-degradation marker: carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were assessed with radioimmunoassays. Bone MDP-99m-Tc scans were performed as well.
RESULTS: Hot spots were showed in 72% of patients. According to bone scintigraphy the patients were divided in to 3 groups: Group I - without hot spots (n = 16; 26%), Group II up to 10 hot spots (n = 25; 42%) and Group III more that 10 hot spots (n = 19; 32%). Mean serum level of ICTP was significantly higher in Group II than in Group I (p < 0.05), as well as in Group III compared to Group II (p < 0.001) and in Group III compared to Group I (p < 0.001). There is only one significant relationship in PINP levels - between Groups II and III.
CONCLUSIONS: The levels of bone pathological degradation (ICTP) and bone formation reflect the metastatic disease extent in bone. Serum ICTP level is more useful in staging metastasis. Significantly higher PINP reflects only a much disseminated process.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was evaluation of the clinical usefulness of bone scintigraphy and of serum bone turnover marker levels in the assessment of skeletal metastases.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated 60 patients with suspected skeletal metastases. Serum level of bone-formation marker: amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP) and a bone-degradation marker: carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were assessed with radioimmunoassays. Bone MDP-99m-Tc scans were performed as well.
RESULTS: Hot spots were showed in 72% of patients. According to bone scintigraphy the patients were divided in to 3 groups: Group I - without hot spots (n = 16; 26%), Group II up to 10 hot spots (n = 25; 42%) and Group III more that 10 hot spots (n = 19; 32%). Mean serum level of ICTP was significantly higher in Group II than in Group I (p < 0.05), as well as in Group III compared to Group II (p < 0.001) and in Group III compared to Group I (p < 0.001). There is only one significant relationship in PINP levels - between Groups II and III.
CONCLUSIONS: The levels of bone pathological degradation (ICTP) and bone formation reflect the metastatic disease extent in bone. Serum ICTP level is more useful in staging metastasis. Significantly higher PINP reflects only a much disseminated process.
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Keywords

bone scintigraphy; skeletal metastases; bone turnover markers

About this article
Title

Bone turnover markers and bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of the skeletal metastases

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 8, No 2 (2005)

Pages

100-104

Published online

2005-06-23

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2005;8(2):100-104.

Keywords

bone scintigraphy
skeletal metastases
bone turnover markers

Authors

Beata E. Chrapko
Anna Nocuń
Renata Gołębiewska
Helena Jankowska
Janina Zaorska-Rajca

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