open access

Vol 9, No 2 (2006)
Published online: 2006-06-21
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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Cerebral blood flow changes in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). A study of 6 cases

Bogna Brockhuis
Nucl. Med. Rev 2006;9(2):114-118.

open access

Vol 9, No 2 (2006)
Published online: 2006-06-21
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract


BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to show the application of cerebral blood flow SPECT (rCBF SPECT) study in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB).
MATERIAL AND METHODS: 99mTc-ECD regional cerebral blood flow SPECT scanning was performed using a triple head, high resolution gamma camera on a group of six patients who ful- -filled criteria for clinical diagnosis of DLB. All patients were examined neurologically by a neurologist specialized in movement disorders. Detailed neuropsychological examination was performed on each patient with a psychological tests battery by an experienced neuropsychologist. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed utilizing an asymmetry index for unilateral perfusion deficits and a comparison to cerebellar perfusion to assess regional cerebral perfusion. A control group of 20 patients was studied to assess normal values, utilizing an asymmetry index for unilateral perfusion deficits, and a comparison to cerebellar perfusion was performed to assess regional cerebral perfusion.
RESULTS: In four cases rCBF SPECT images showed patterns of bilateral hypoperfusion of the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. In two other cases parietal deficits were observed.
CONCLUSIONS: Functional neuroimaging with the use of CBF SPECT may contribute to clinical diagnosis of DLB.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to show the application of cerebral blood flow SPECT (rCBF SPECT) study in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB).
MATERIAL AND METHODS: 99mTc-ECD regional cerebral blood flow SPECT scanning was performed using a triple head, high resolution gamma camera on a group of six patients who ful- -filled criteria for clinical diagnosis of DLB. All patients were examined neurologically by a neurologist specialized in movement disorders. Detailed neuropsychological examination was performed on each patient with a psychological tests battery by an experienced neuropsychologist. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed utilizing an asymmetry index for unilateral perfusion deficits and a comparison to cerebellar perfusion to assess regional cerebral perfusion. A control group of 20 patients was studied to assess normal values, utilizing an asymmetry index for unilateral perfusion deficits, and a comparison to cerebellar perfusion was performed to assess regional cerebral perfusion.
RESULTS: In four cases rCBF SPECT images showed patterns of bilateral hypoperfusion of the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. In two other cases parietal deficits were observed.
CONCLUSIONS: Functional neuroimaging with the use of CBF SPECT may contribute to clinical diagnosis of DLB.
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Keywords

dementia with Lewy bodies; single photon emission computed tomography; cerebral blood flow

About this article
Title

Cerebral blood flow changes in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). A study of 6 cases

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 9, No 2 (2006)

Pages

114-118

Published online

2006-06-21

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2006;9(2):114-118.

Keywords

dementia with Lewy bodies
single photon emission computed tomography
cerebral blood flow

Authors

Bogna Brockhuis

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