open access

Vol 53, No 4 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-02-20
Accepted: 2019-05-12
Get Citation

Multiple sclerosis: oral health, behaviours and limitations of daily oral hygiene — a questionnaire study

Beata Łabuz-Roszak, Ewa Niewiadomska, Anna Starostka-Tatar, Katarzyna Kubicka-Bączyk, Ewa Krzystanek, Michał Arkuszewski, Krystyna Tyrpień-Golder, Barbara Rybus-Kalinowska, Bogna Pierzchała, Krystyna Pierzchała
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0033
·
Pubmed: 31441495
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(4):271-276.

open access

Vol 53, No 4 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-08-22
Submitted: 2019-02-20
Accepted: 2019-05-12

Abstract

Clinical rationale for the study. Neurological deficits and progressing disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may hamper daily oral hygiene, but their relations with oral problems have not yet been clearly determined.

Aim of the study. The aim of this study was to identify the most significant dental problems and limitations of daily oral hygiene in Polish patients with MS.

Material and methods. 199 patients with diagnosed MS (median age 37 years) treated in the neurological outpatient clinic were interviewed using a paper-based questionnaire. They provided answers on oral health, behaviours and the limitations of their daily oral hygiene. Clinical information regarding symptoms, MS phenotype, relapses, medication and degrees of disability was based on medical records.

Results. The most frequent symptoms were dry mouth (43.2%) and bleeding from gums (28.1%). Dry mouth was more frequent in patients with secondary-progressive MS (SPMS) than relapsing-remitting MS (65.4% vs 41.3%, p = 0.023). Patients with bleeding from gums had had MS for a longer duration (median 6 vs 4 years, p = 0.002). Difficulties in daily oral hygiene were more frequent in patients with SPMS (24.0% vs 8.1%; p = 0.016). Greater proportions of patients with muscle weakness of limbs, imbalance or pain brushed their teeth irregularly. Frequent (i.e. at least every six months) visits to the dentist’s surgery were uncommon in patients with SPMS (12.0% vs 39.7%, p = 0.010).

Conclusions and clinical implications. Dry mouth and bleeding from gums are more frequent in patients with longer lasting and more advanced types of MS. Daily oral hygiene and oral health self-control is limited in patients with MS, mainly due to motor deficits, balance problems and pain, and this becomes worse with disease duration. To minimise the burden of the disease, patients with MS require better education and improvement in their awareness regarding proper oral health control, such as the use of electric toothbrushes. In addition, patients with chronic and progressive disability from multiple sclerosis may benefit from better organised access to dental care.

Abstract

Clinical rationale for the study. Neurological deficits and progressing disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may hamper daily oral hygiene, but their relations with oral problems have not yet been clearly determined.

Aim of the study. The aim of this study was to identify the most significant dental problems and limitations of daily oral hygiene in Polish patients with MS.

Material and methods. 199 patients with diagnosed MS (median age 37 years) treated in the neurological outpatient clinic were interviewed using a paper-based questionnaire. They provided answers on oral health, behaviours and the limitations of their daily oral hygiene. Clinical information regarding symptoms, MS phenotype, relapses, medication and degrees of disability was based on medical records.

Results. The most frequent symptoms were dry mouth (43.2%) and bleeding from gums (28.1%). Dry mouth was more frequent in patients with secondary-progressive MS (SPMS) than relapsing-remitting MS (65.4% vs 41.3%, p = 0.023). Patients with bleeding from gums had had MS for a longer duration (median 6 vs 4 years, p = 0.002). Difficulties in daily oral hygiene were more frequent in patients with SPMS (24.0% vs 8.1%; p = 0.016). Greater proportions of patients with muscle weakness of limbs, imbalance or pain brushed their teeth irregularly. Frequent (i.e. at least every six months) visits to the dentist’s surgery were uncommon in patients with SPMS (12.0% vs 39.7%, p = 0.010).

Conclusions and clinical implications. Dry mouth and bleeding from gums are more frequent in patients with longer lasting and more advanced types of MS. Daily oral hygiene and oral health self-control is limited in patients with MS, mainly due to motor deficits, balance problems and pain, and this becomes worse with disease duration. To minimise the burden of the disease, patients with MS require better education and improvement in their awareness regarding proper oral health control, such as the use of electric toothbrushes. In addition, patients with chronic and progressive disability from multiple sclerosis may benefit from better organised access to dental care.

Get Citation

Keywords

multiple sclerosis, oral health, oral hygiene, questionnaire

About this article
Title

Multiple sclerosis: oral health, behaviours and limitations of daily oral hygiene — a questionnaire study

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 4 (2019)

Pages

271-276

Published online

2019-08-22

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0033

Pubmed

31441495

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(4):271-276.

Keywords

multiple sclerosis
oral health
oral hygiene
questionnaire

Authors

Beata Łabuz-Roszak
Ewa Niewiadomska
Anna Starostka-Tatar
Katarzyna Kubicka-Bączyk
Ewa Krzystanek
Michał Arkuszewski
Krystyna Tyrpień-Golder
Barbara Rybus-Kalinowska
Bogna Pierzchała
Krystyna Pierzchała

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