open access

Vol 53, No 1 (2019)
Research papers
Published online: 2019-01-04
Submitted: 2018-11-14
Accepted: 2018-11-14
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No association between MRI changes in the lumbar spine and intensity of pain, quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with low back pain

Anna Babińska, Wojciech Wawrzynek, Elżbieta Czech, Jarosław Skupiński, Jarosław Szczygieł, Beata Łabuz-Roszak
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2018.0006
·
Pubmed: 30614517
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(1):74-82.

open access

Vol 53, No 1 (2019)
Research papers
Published online: 2019-01-04
Submitted: 2018-11-14
Accepted: 2018-11-14

Abstract

Introduction. The association between changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical symptoms in patients with low back pain (LBP) is unclear.

Aim. To evaluate correlations between combined MRI findings of the lumbar spine (LS) and pain intensity, depressive and anxiety symptoms and quality of life in patients with LBP.

Material and methods. 200 subjects (93 men and 107 women; mean age 51.42 ± 13.21 years) with LBP referred for MRI were enrolled in the study. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Quality of Life Scales (EQ-5D, EQ-VAS) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). MRI scans were assessed according to a scoring system prepared by the authors, and the total MRI score was calculated.

Results. The mean total MRI score was 11.59 ± 6.73 points (range 0–50 points) and was higher in men than in women (p = 0.015). A correlation was observed between total MRI score and age (p < 0.001) and between total MRI score and BMI (p = 0.005). An association was found between total MRI score and EQ-5D (p = 0.012) and HADS-D results (p = 0.003). VAS and HADS-A results did not correlate with MRI score. When multivariate analysis was done, the total MRI score was only significantly related to age and BMI, and association between the total MRI score and EQ-5D or HADS-D results was not confirmed. Decreased quality of life was associated with increased intensity of pain and depressive and anxiety symptoms.

Conclusions. Combined MRI changes in LS do not correlate with pain intensity, depressive and anxiety syndromes or quality of life in patients with LBP.

Abstract

Introduction. The association between changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical symptoms in patients with low back pain (LBP) is unclear.

Aim. To evaluate correlations between combined MRI findings of the lumbar spine (LS) and pain intensity, depressive and anxiety symptoms and quality of life in patients with LBP.

Material and methods. 200 subjects (93 men and 107 women; mean age 51.42 ± 13.21 years) with LBP referred for MRI were enrolled in the study. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Quality of Life Scales (EQ-5D, EQ-VAS) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). MRI scans were assessed according to a scoring system prepared by the authors, and the total MRI score was calculated.

Results. The mean total MRI score was 11.59 ± 6.73 points (range 0–50 points) and was higher in men than in women (p = 0.015). A correlation was observed between total MRI score and age (p < 0.001) and between total MRI score and BMI (p = 0.005). An association was found between total MRI score and EQ-5D (p = 0.012) and HADS-D results (p = 0.003). VAS and HADS-A results did not correlate with MRI score. When multivariate analysis was done, the total MRI score was only significantly related to age and BMI, and association between the total MRI score and EQ-5D or HADS-D results was not confirmed. Decreased quality of life was associated with increased intensity of pain and depressive and anxiety symptoms.

Conclusions. Combined MRI changes in LS do not correlate with pain intensity, depressive and anxiety syndromes or quality of life in patients with LBP.

Get Citation

Keywords

low back pain, quality of life, depressive symptoms, anxiety, MRI examination

About this article
Title

No association between MRI changes in the lumbar spine and intensity of pain, quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with low back pain

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 1 (2019)

Pages

74-82

Published online

2019-01-04

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2018.0006

Pubmed

30614517

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(1):74-82.

Keywords

low back pain
quality of life
depressive symptoms
anxiety
MRI examination

Authors

Anna Babińska
Wojciech Wawrzynek
Elżbieta Czech
Jarosław Skupiński
Jarosław Szczygieł
Beata Łabuz-Roszak

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