open access

Vol 49, No 4 (2015)
Original research articles
Submitted: 2015-04-02
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Writing in Richardson variant of progressive supranuclear palsy in comparison to progressive non-fluent aphasia

Emilia J. Sitek, Anna Barczak, Klaudia Kluj-Kozłowska, Marcin Kozłowski, Ewa Narożańska, Agnieszka Konkel, Magda Dąbrowska, Maria Barcikowska, Jarosław Sławek
DOI: 10.1016/j.pjnns.2015.05.004
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2015;49(4):217-222.

open access

Vol 49, No 4 (2015)
Original research articles
Submitted: 2015-04-02

Abstract

Background

The overlap between progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) is being increasingly recognized. In this paper descriptive writing in patients with Richardson syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP-RS) is compared to writing samples from patients with PNFA.

Methods

Twenty-seven patients participated in the study: 17 with the clinical diagnosis of PSP-RS and 10 with PNFA. Untimed written picture description was administered during neuropsychological assessment and subsequently scored by two raters blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Lexical and syntactic content, as well as writing errors (e.g. omission and perseverative errors) were analyzed.

Results

In patients with PSP-RS both letter and diacritic mark omission errors were very frequent. Micrographia was present in 8 cases (47%) in PSP-RS group and in one case (10%) with PNFA. Perseverative errors did not differentiate between the groups.

Conclusions

As omission errors predominate in writing of patients with PSP-RS, writing seems to be compromised mainly because of oculomotor deficits, that may alter visual feedback while writing.

Abstract

Background

The overlap between progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) is being increasingly recognized. In this paper descriptive writing in patients with Richardson syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP-RS) is compared to writing samples from patients with PNFA.

Methods

Twenty-seven patients participated in the study: 17 with the clinical diagnosis of PSP-RS and 10 with PNFA. Untimed written picture description was administered during neuropsychological assessment and subsequently scored by two raters blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Lexical and syntactic content, as well as writing errors (e.g. omission and perseverative errors) were analyzed.

Results

In patients with PSP-RS both letter and diacritic mark omission errors were very frequent. Micrographia was present in 8 cases (47%) in PSP-RS group and in one case (10%) with PNFA. Perseverative errors did not differentiate between the groups.

Conclusions

As omission errors predominate in writing of patients with PSP-RS, writing seems to be compromised mainly because of oculomotor deficits, that may alter visual feedback while writing.

Get Citation

Keywords

Progressive supranuclear palsy, Primary progressive aphasia, Writing, Agraphia

About this article
Title

Writing in Richardson variant of progressive supranuclear palsy in comparison to progressive non-fluent aphasia

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 49, No 4 (2015)

Pages

217-222

DOI

10.1016/j.pjnns.2015.05.004

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2015;49(4):217-222.

Keywords

Progressive supranuclear palsy
Primary progressive aphasia
Writing
Agraphia

Authors

Emilia J. Sitek
Anna Barczak
Klaudia Kluj-Kozłowska
Marcin Kozłowski
Ewa Narożańska
Agnieszka Konkel
Magda Dąbrowska
Maria Barcikowska
Jarosław Sławek

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