open access

Vol 47, No 6 (2013)
ARTYKUŁ ORYGINALNY
Submitted: 2012-05-27
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Assessment of explicit and implicit linguistic impairments in patients with aphasia after resection of tumour of the left cerebral hemisphere. Preliminary results

Monika Teresa Stomal-Słowińska, Beata Daniluk, Joanna Trela, Jerzy Słowiński, Krzysztof Majchrzak, Danuta Kądzielowa, Henryk Majchrzak
DOI: 10.5114/ninp.2013.39073
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2013;47(6):555-563.

open access

Vol 47, No 6 (2013)
ARTYKUŁ ORYGINALNY
Submitted: 2012-05-27

Abstract

Background and purpose

Classical definitions of aphasia describe deficits of different language levels (syntactic, semantic, phonologic) hindering the ability to communicate. Recent studies indicate, however, that impairment of particular aspects of linguistic competencies in aphasia differs in severity. Contemporary approach to the aphasic symptoms presents them as disturbed access of linguistic representations to the awareness system. Accordingly, such an approach requires different types of tasks: direct, involving explicit language processes, and indirect, based on implicit language representations. The aim of our study was to examine explicit and implicit language processes in patients with aphasia after resection of the tumour of left cerebral hemisphere along with characterization of relationships between explicit and implicit language processes.

Material and methods

Our cohort included 28 right-handed patients who were divided into four equal groups: two clinical (brain tumours) and two control (lumbar disc disease). Four tasks that assess and compare language processes: lexical decisions (at explicit and implicit levels), sorting of picture captions and word monitoring were implemented.

Results

In direct tasks, patients with aphasia provided less correct lexical decisions at word level, but did not show deficits in sentence comprehension. In both groups, no priming effect was observed in tasks requiring implicit lexical decisions. The longest time was found in non-primed words, the shortest in pseudowords. The differences between groups regarding word monitoring were also observed. Patients with aphasia obtained longer reaction times in all types of sentences (of different grade of language correctness), with respect to low- and high- frequency words.

Conclusions

Patients with aphasia after brain tumour resection show more pronounced impairments of explicit than implicit linguistic behavior; the same effect was found in studies on forgetting in amnestic syndrome.

Abstract

Background and purpose

Classical definitions of aphasia describe deficits of different language levels (syntactic, semantic, phonologic) hindering the ability to communicate. Recent studies indicate, however, that impairment of particular aspects of linguistic competencies in aphasia differs in severity. Contemporary approach to the aphasic symptoms presents them as disturbed access of linguistic representations to the awareness system. Accordingly, such an approach requires different types of tasks: direct, involving explicit language processes, and indirect, based on implicit language representations. The aim of our study was to examine explicit and implicit language processes in patients with aphasia after resection of the tumour of left cerebral hemisphere along with characterization of relationships between explicit and implicit language processes.

Material and methods

Our cohort included 28 right-handed patients who were divided into four equal groups: two clinical (brain tumours) and two control (lumbar disc disease). Four tasks that assess and compare language processes: lexical decisions (at explicit and implicit levels), sorting of picture captions and word monitoring were implemented.

Results

In direct tasks, patients with aphasia provided less correct lexical decisions at word level, but did not show deficits in sentence comprehension. In both groups, no priming effect was observed in tasks requiring implicit lexical decisions. The longest time was found in non-primed words, the shortest in pseudowords. The differences between groups regarding word monitoring were also observed. Patients with aphasia obtained longer reaction times in all types of sentences (of different grade of language correctness), with respect to low- and high- frequency words.

Conclusions

Patients with aphasia after brain tumour resection show more pronounced impairments of explicit than implicit linguistic behavior; the same effect was found in studies on forgetting in amnestic syndrome.

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Keywords

tumours of the left cerebral hemisphere, explicit and implicit language processes, aphasia, priming

About this article
Title

Assessment of explicit and implicit linguistic impairments in patients with aphasia after resection of tumour of the left cerebral hemisphere. Preliminary results

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 47, No 6 (2013)

Pages

555-563

DOI

10.5114/ninp.2013.39073

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2013;47(6):555-563.

Keywords

tumours of the left cerebral hemisphere
explicit and implicit language processes
aphasia
priming

Authors

Monika Teresa Stomal-Słowińska
Beata Daniluk
Joanna Trela
Jerzy Słowiński
Krzysztof Majchrzak
Danuta Kądzielowa
Henryk Majchrzak

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