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Published online: 2021-09-28
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Association between Intermountain Risk Score and long-term mortality with the transcatheter aortic valve ımplantation procedure

Emre Özdemir1, Şaban Esen1, Sadık Volkan Emren1, Mustafa Karaca1, Cem Nazlı1
DOI: 10.33963/KP.a2021.0120
Affiliations
  1. Katip Celebi University, Ataturk Education and Research Hospital, Cardiology Clinic, Izmir, Turkey

open access

Online first
Original article
Published online: 2021-09-28

Abstract

Background: Since its first introduction, the spectrum and frequency of use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has increased throughout the world. Therefore, it is crucial to determine which patients are at high mortality risk with TAVI. The Intermountain Risk Score (IMRS) is a score calculated from laboratory parameters. This study aimed to determine the long-term mortality of TAVI patients using the IMRS and to compare it with traditional scoring systems.

Methods: The study included a total of 133 patients undergoing TAVI at our clinic from 2010 to 2019. Demographic data, co-morbid diseases, echocardiographic and laboratory parameters were collected retrospectively. The performance of IMRS was assessed compared to the mortality determination in the overall patient population.

Results: Mortality did not develop during follow-up in 73 patients (Group 1) and mortality was seen in 60 patients (45.1%) (Group 2). The survival period had a mean (standard deviation [SD]) of 1433 (124) days. The mean IMRS was 1.67 (0.7) in Group 1 and 2.33 (0.72) in Group 2 (P <0.001). In multivariable analyses, only high risk of IMRS (HR, 3.430; 95% CI, 1.537–7.653; P = 0.003) and EuroSCORE II (HR, 1.141; 95% CI, 1.011–1.288; P = 0.03) were seen to independently predict long-term mortality.

Conclusions: From the evaluation of all laboratory and echocardiography parameters, long-term mortality (>30 days) following the TAVI procedure can be said to be higher in patients with a high IMRS. The data from this study can be considered of value in demonstrating the clinical significance of IMRS calculation before the TAVI procedure.

Abstract

Background: Since its first introduction, the spectrum and frequency of use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has increased throughout the world. Therefore, it is crucial to determine which patients are at high mortality risk with TAVI. The Intermountain Risk Score (IMRS) is a score calculated from laboratory parameters. This study aimed to determine the long-term mortality of TAVI patients using the IMRS and to compare it with traditional scoring systems.

Methods: The study included a total of 133 patients undergoing TAVI at our clinic from 2010 to 2019. Demographic data, co-morbid diseases, echocardiographic and laboratory parameters were collected retrospectively. The performance of IMRS was assessed compared to the mortality determination in the overall patient population.

Results: Mortality did not develop during follow-up in 73 patients (Group 1) and mortality was seen in 60 patients (45.1%) (Group 2). The survival period had a mean (standard deviation [SD]) of 1433 (124) days. The mean IMRS was 1.67 (0.7) in Group 1 and 2.33 (0.72) in Group 2 (P <0.001). In multivariable analyses, only high risk of IMRS (HR, 3.430; 95% CI, 1.537–7.653; P = 0.003) and EuroSCORE II (HR, 1.141; 95% CI, 1.011–1.288; P = 0.03) were seen to independently predict long-term mortality.

Conclusions: From the evaluation of all laboratory and echocardiography parameters, long-term mortality (>30 days) following the TAVI procedure can be said to be higher in patients with a high IMRS. The data from this study can be considered of value in demonstrating the clinical significance of IMRS calculation before the TAVI procedure.

Get Citation
About this article
Title

Association between Intermountain Risk Score and long-term mortality with the transcatheter aortic valve ımplantation procedure

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Online first

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-09-28

DOI

10.33963/KP.a2021.0120

Authors

Emre Özdemir
Şaban Esen
Sadık Volkan Emren
Mustafa Karaca
Cem Nazlı

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