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Effect of mobile application and smart devices on heart rate variability in diabetic patients with high cardiovascular risk: a sub-study of the LIGHT randomized clinical trial

Mert İlker Hayıroğlu1, Göksel Çinier1, Gizem Yüksel1, Levent Pay1, Furkan Durak1, Tufan Çınar2, Duygu İnan1, Kemal Emrecan Parsova1, Elif Gökçen Vatanoğlu1, Mehmet Şeker1, Yavuz Karabağ3, Selin Cilli Hayıroğlu4, Can Altundaş1, Ahmet İlker Tekkeşin1
DOI: 10.33963/KP.a2021.0112
·
Pubmed: 34599495
Affiliations
  1. Department of Cardiology, Dr. Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  2. Department of Cardiology, Haydarpasa Sultan II Abdulhamid Han Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  3. Department of Cardiology, Kafkas University Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey
  4. Department of Rheumatology, Marmara University Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey

open access

Online first
Original article
Published online: 2021-09-20

Abstract

Background: This investigation aims to evaluate the effect of mobile application and smart devices on frequency and time domains of heart rate variability (HRV) in diabetic patients in 1-year follow-up.

Methods: This is diabetic subgroup post-hoc analyses of Lifestyle Intervention usinG mobile technology in patients with High cardiovascular risk: a pragmatic randomized clinical Trial (LIGHT). 109 and 118 patients were enrolled to the intervention plus usual care and usual care arms, respectively. The study outcome was the 1-year HRV parameters adjusted to the baseline HRV parameters. HRV measures were recorded for every patient at the randomization and final visits with 24-hour Holter monitoring.

Results: There was an improvement in the standard deviation of normal to normal (SDNN) R-R intervals 24-hour by 4.8 (adjusted treatment effect 4.8, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1–9.5; P = 0.044) in the intervention plus usual care compared to usual care after a 1-year follow-up. The improvement was also experienced in other HRV time domains including standard deviation of the mean R-R intervals calculated over a 5-minute period, SDNN, square root of the mean squared difference of successive R-R intervals and the percentage of the differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals exceeding 50 milliseconds. A significant enhancement was also detected in HRV frequency domains of total power low frequency and high frequency in in the intervention plus usual care compared to usual care after a 1-year follow-up.

Conclusions: The mobile application and smart device technology compared to usual care alone improved HRV parameters in diabetic patients at 1-year follow-up.

Abstract

Background: This investigation aims to evaluate the effect of mobile application and smart devices on frequency and time domains of heart rate variability (HRV) in diabetic patients in 1-year follow-up.

Methods: This is diabetic subgroup post-hoc analyses of Lifestyle Intervention usinG mobile technology in patients with High cardiovascular risk: a pragmatic randomized clinical Trial (LIGHT). 109 and 118 patients were enrolled to the intervention plus usual care and usual care arms, respectively. The study outcome was the 1-year HRV parameters adjusted to the baseline HRV parameters. HRV measures were recorded for every patient at the randomization and final visits with 24-hour Holter monitoring.

Results: There was an improvement in the standard deviation of normal to normal (SDNN) R-R intervals 24-hour by 4.8 (adjusted treatment effect 4.8, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1–9.5; P = 0.044) in the intervention plus usual care compared to usual care after a 1-year follow-up. The improvement was also experienced in other HRV time domains including standard deviation of the mean R-R intervals calculated over a 5-minute period, SDNN, square root of the mean squared difference of successive R-R intervals and the percentage of the differences between adjacent normal R-R intervals exceeding 50 milliseconds. A significant enhancement was also detected in HRV frequency domains of total power low frequency and high frequency in in the intervention plus usual care compared to usual care after a 1-year follow-up.

Conclusions: The mobile application and smart device technology compared to usual care alone improved HRV parameters in diabetic patients at 1-year follow-up.

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Keywords

diabetes mellitus, heart rate variability, mobile application

About this article
Title

Effect of mobile application and smart devices on heart rate variability in diabetic patients with high cardiovascular risk: a sub-study of the LIGHT randomized clinical trial

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Online first

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-09-20

DOI

10.33963/KP.a2021.0112

Pubmed

34599495

Keywords

diabetes mellitus
heart rate variability
mobile application

Authors

Mert İlker Hayıroğlu
Göksel Çinier
Gizem Yüksel
Levent Pay
Furkan Durak
Tufan Çınar
Duygu İnan
Kemal Emrecan Parsova
Elif Gökçen Vatanoğlu
Mehmet Şeker
Yavuz Karabağ
Selin Cilli Hayıroğlu
Can Altundaş
Ahmet İlker Tekkeşin

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