open access

Vol 75, No 7 (2017)
Original articles
Published online: 2017-03-31
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Cardiovascular health knowledge of the Polish population. Comparison of two national multi-centre health surveys: WOBASZ and WOBASZ II

Aleksandra Piwońska, Walerian Piotrowski, Jerzy Piwoński, Magdalena Kozela, Paweł Nadrowski, Wojciech Bielecki, Krystyna Kozakiewicz, Andrzej Pająk, Andrzej Tykarski, Tomasz Zdrojewski, Wojciech Drygas
DOI: 10.5603/KP.a2017.0070
·
Kardiol Pol 2017;75(7):711-719.

open access

Vol 75, No 7 (2017)
Original articles
Published online: 2017-03-31

Abstract

Background and aim: To compare the cardiovascular health knowledge (CHK) of the adult Polish population in the years 2003–2005 and 2013–2014, and to evaluate the CHK determinants in the Polish adult population.

Methods: Data came from the two random samples of the Polish population, screened in 2003–2005 in the WOBASZ health survey (6392 men and 7153 women, aged 20–74 years) and in 2013–2014 in the WOBASZ II health survey (2751 men and 3418 women, aged 20+ years). For the present analysis, the population of WOBASZ II was limited to persons aged 20–74 years. A CHK score (CHKs) was constructed based on questionnaire answers of responders, and the results of physical examination and ranged from –1 (lowest knowledge) to +6 (highest knowledge).

Results: Women had greater CHK than men. In both studies, about 30% of women and 40% of men did not know their blood pressure (BP). About 20% of men and women that declared their BP awareness was not able to classify it correctly to the normal or high category. Most persons that declared body weight awareness could give their body weight to within 2 kg and could correctly classify it as normal or overweight/obesity. The mean CHKs raised in men from 1.74 in WOBASZ to 1.93 in WOBASZ II (in women, respectively, from 2.10 to 2.23). The chance of having CHK greater than mean value of CHKs increased in men by 31% and in women by 27% in WOBASZ II compared to WOBASZ (ORCHK = 1.31, p < 0.0001 in men; ORCHK = 1.27, p < 0.0001 in women). Younger, better educated persons and men with coronary artery disease history and persons with familial history of death from myocardial infarction or stroke had greater health knowledge.

Conclusions: Since 2003 Polish adults significantly advanced their knowledge and awareness of cardiovascular risk factors. Gender, age, education level, coronary artery disease history, and family history of cardiovascular disease death are significant determinants of CHK. From 20% to 30% of studied persons who declared their awareness, were shown to be unaware of their own cardiovascular disease risk factors.

Abstract

Background and aim: To compare the cardiovascular health knowledge (CHK) of the adult Polish population in the years 2003–2005 and 2013–2014, and to evaluate the CHK determinants in the Polish adult population.

Methods: Data came from the two random samples of the Polish population, screened in 2003–2005 in the WOBASZ health survey (6392 men and 7153 women, aged 20–74 years) and in 2013–2014 in the WOBASZ II health survey (2751 men and 3418 women, aged 20+ years). For the present analysis, the population of WOBASZ II was limited to persons aged 20–74 years. A CHK score (CHKs) was constructed based on questionnaire answers of responders, and the results of physical examination and ranged from –1 (lowest knowledge) to +6 (highest knowledge).

Results: Women had greater CHK than men. In both studies, about 30% of women and 40% of men did not know their blood pressure (BP). About 20% of men and women that declared their BP awareness was not able to classify it correctly to the normal or high category. Most persons that declared body weight awareness could give their body weight to within 2 kg and could correctly classify it as normal or overweight/obesity. The mean CHKs raised in men from 1.74 in WOBASZ to 1.93 in WOBASZ II (in women, respectively, from 2.10 to 2.23). The chance of having CHK greater than mean value of CHKs increased in men by 31% and in women by 27% in WOBASZ II compared to WOBASZ (ORCHK = 1.31, p < 0.0001 in men; ORCHK = 1.27, p < 0.0001 in women). Younger, better educated persons and men with coronary artery disease history and persons with familial history of death from myocardial infarction or stroke had greater health knowledge.

Conclusions: Since 2003 Polish adults significantly advanced their knowledge and awareness of cardiovascular risk factors. Gender, age, education level, coronary artery disease history, and family history of cardiovascular disease death are significant determinants of CHK. From 20% to 30% of studied persons who declared their awareness, were shown to be unaware of their own cardiovascular disease risk factors.

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Keywords

cardiovascular health knowledge, national health survey, Polish population

About this article
Title

Cardiovascular health knowledge of the Polish population. Comparison of two national multi-centre health surveys: WOBASZ and WOBASZ II

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 75, No 7 (2017)

Pages

711-719

Published online

2017-03-31

DOI

10.5603/KP.a2017.0070

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2017;75(7):711-719.

Keywords

cardiovascular health knowledge
national health survey
Polish population

Authors

Aleksandra Piwońska
Walerian Piotrowski
Jerzy Piwoński
Magdalena Kozela
Paweł Nadrowski
Wojciech Bielecki
Krystyna Kozakiewicz
Andrzej Pająk
Andrzej Tykarski
Tomasz Zdrojewski
Wojciech Drygas

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