open access

Vol 80, No 1 (2022)
Original article
Published online: 2021-12-09
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The usefulness of telemedicine devices in patients with severe heart failure with an implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy system during two years of observation

Marcin Wita1, Michał Orszulak1, Krzysztof Szydło1, Wojciech Wróbel1, Artur Filipecki1, Karolina Simionescu2, Karol Sanecki2, Urszula Uchwat3, Maciej Wybraniec1, Zbigniew Tabor4, Krzysztof Gołba2, Krystian Wita1, Katarzyna Mizia-Stec1
DOI: 10.33963/KP.a2021.0175
·
Pubmed: 34883524
·
Kardiol Pol 2022;80(1):41-48.
Affiliations
  1. 1st Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  2. Department of Electrocardiology and Heart Failure, S School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  3. Department of Neurology, Professor Leszek Giec, Upper-Silesian Heart Center, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
  4. Telemedycyna Polska SA, Poland

open access

Vol 80, No 1 (2022)
Original article
Published online: 2021-12-09

Abstract

Background: Heart failure (HF) remains a disease with a poor prognosis. Telemonitoring is a medical service aimed at remote monitoring of patients.
Aim: The study aimed to identify the clinical relevance of non-invasive telemonitoring devices in HF patients.
Methods: Sixty patients aged 66.1 (11) years, with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 26.3 (6.8)% underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) implantation. They were randomly allocated to the control (standard medical care) or study (standard medical care + telemonitoring device) groups. During the follow-up (24 months), the patients in the study group provided body mass and blood pressure, along with electrocardiogram on a daily basis. The data were transferred to the monitoring center and consulted with a cardiologist. Transthoracic echocardiography and a 6-minute walk test were performed before and 24 months after CRT implantation.
Results: During the two-year observation, the composite endpoint (death or HF hospitalization) occurred in 21 patients, more often in the control group (46.8% vs. 21.4%; P = 0.026). In univariate analysis: the use of telemetry (hazard ratio [HR], 0.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07–0.7; P = 0.004), the presence of coronary heart disease (HR, 41.4; 95% CI, 3.1–567.7; P = 0.005), hypertension (HR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.07–0.90; P = 0.035), and patient’s body mass (HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14–0.92; P = 0.03) were related to the occurrence of the composite endpoint.
Conclusions: The use of a telemonitoring device in CRT recipients improved the prognosis in 2-year observation and contributed to the reduction of HF hospitalization.

Abstract

Background: Heart failure (HF) remains a disease with a poor prognosis. Telemonitoring is a medical service aimed at remote monitoring of patients.
Aim: The study aimed to identify the clinical relevance of non-invasive telemonitoring devices in HF patients.
Methods: Sixty patients aged 66.1 (11) years, with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 26.3 (6.8)% underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) implantation. They were randomly allocated to the control (standard medical care) or study (standard medical care + telemonitoring device) groups. During the follow-up (24 months), the patients in the study group provided body mass and blood pressure, along with electrocardiogram on a daily basis. The data were transferred to the monitoring center and consulted with a cardiologist. Transthoracic echocardiography and a 6-minute walk test were performed before and 24 months after CRT implantation.
Results: During the two-year observation, the composite endpoint (death or HF hospitalization) occurred in 21 patients, more often in the control group (46.8% vs. 21.4%; P = 0.026). In univariate analysis: the use of telemetry (hazard ratio [HR], 0.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07–0.7; P = 0.004), the presence of coronary heart disease (HR, 41.4; 95% CI, 3.1–567.7; P = 0.005), hypertension (HR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.07–0.90; P = 0.035), and patient’s body mass (HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14–0.92; P = 0.03) were related to the occurrence of the composite endpoint.
Conclusions: The use of a telemonitoring device in CRT recipients improved the prognosis in 2-year observation and contributed to the reduction of HF hospitalization.

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Keywords

cardiac resynchronization therapy, COVID-19, heart failure, telemedicine

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Title

The usefulness of telemedicine devices in patients with severe heart failure with an implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy system during two years of observation

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Vol 80, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

41-48

Published online

2021-12-09

Page views

1372

Article views/downloads

363

DOI

10.33963/KP.a2021.0175

Pubmed

34883524

Bibliographic record

Kardiol Pol 2022;80(1):41-48.

Keywords

cardiac resynchronization therapy
COVID-19
heart failure
telemedicine

Authors

Marcin Wita
Michał Orszulak
Krzysztof Szydło
Wojciech Wróbel
Artur Filipecki
Karolina Simionescu
Karol Sanecki
Urszula Uchwat
Maciej Wybraniec
Zbigniew Tabor
Krzysztof Gołba
Krystian Wita
Katarzyna Mizia-Stec

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