open access

Vol 70, No 1 (2019)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2019-03-28
Submitted: 2019-02-14
Accepted: 2019-03-01
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A survey of jellyfish sting knowledge among Thai divers in Thailand

Sukati Suriyan, Kanlaya Haruethaikan, Roopngam Evelyn Piyachat
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2019.0002
·
Pubmed: 30931512
·
International Maritime Health 2019;70(1):11-16.

open access

Vol 70, No 1 (2019)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original articles
Published online: 2019-03-28
Submitted: 2019-02-14
Accepted: 2019-03-01

Abstract

Background: In tropical regions, jellyfish envenomation is a persistent hazard for people who spend time in the sea. Jellyfish stings can be dangerous, and among the people who face the greatest risk are scuba divers. This study therefore sought to determine the level of knowledge divers in Thailand have about the threat of jellyfish envenomation. 

Materials and methods: In April 2018, a total of 238 divers responded to a questionnaire, thereby providing data for further statistical analysis.

Results: The findings revealed that 31.91% of the study participants cited jellyfish stings as their most frequently encountered injury, with 68.09% having personal experience of the problem, or having seen others injured by jellyfish. However, 34.03% of the sample respondents believed their own level of knowledge to be “low” or “none”. The mean score was 71%, which can be considered satisfactory, but the scores for items concerning the recognition of signs of envenomation and items about first aid responses (52.74% and 59.13%, respectively) were not acceptable. 

Conclusions: Divers frequently experience jellyfish stings, and diving personnel were highly rated for their knowledge in this area. However, very few were fully confident in their first aid capabilities, and therefore it can be argued that it is necessary to improve the level of medical education and to provide training to eliminate this weakness. 

Abstract

Background: In tropical regions, jellyfish envenomation is a persistent hazard for people who spend time in the sea. Jellyfish stings can be dangerous, and among the people who face the greatest risk are scuba divers. This study therefore sought to determine the level of knowledge divers in Thailand have about the threat of jellyfish envenomation. 

Materials and methods: In April 2018, a total of 238 divers responded to a questionnaire, thereby providing data for further statistical analysis.

Results: The findings revealed that 31.91% of the study participants cited jellyfish stings as their most frequently encountered injury, with 68.09% having personal experience of the problem, or having seen others injured by jellyfish. However, 34.03% of the sample respondents believed their own level of knowledge to be “low” or “none”. The mean score was 71%, which can be considered satisfactory, but the scores for items concerning the recognition of signs of envenomation and items about first aid responses (52.74% and 59.13%, respectively) were not acceptable. 

Conclusions: Divers frequently experience jellyfish stings, and diving personnel were highly rated for their knowledge in this area. However, very few were fully confident in their first aid capabilities, and therefore it can be argued that it is necessary to improve the level of medical education and to provide training to eliminate this weakness. 

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Keywords

divers; jellyfish sting; knowledge; medical education

About this article
Title

A survey of jellyfish sting knowledge among Thai divers in Thailand

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 70, No 1 (2019)

Pages

11-16

Published online

2019-03-28

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2019.0002

Pubmed

30931512

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2019;70(1):11-16.

Keywords

divers
jellyfish sting
knowledge
medical education

Authors

Sukati Suriyan
Kanlaya Haruethaikan
Roopngam Evelyn Piyachat

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