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Published online: 2021-12-29
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The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome

Karolina Skrzynska1, Agnieszka Zachurzok2, Ryszard Tomaszewski3, Aneta Gawlik1, Ewa Malecka-Tendera
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0238
·
Pubmed: 35072232
Affiliations
  1. Department of Pediatrics and Pediatric Endocrinology, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland, Poland
  2. Student’s Scientific Society, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medical Sciences in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland, Poland
  3. Department of Pediatric Traumatology and Orthopedics, Upper Silesian Children’s Health Centre, Katowice, Poland, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-12-29

Abstract

Objectives: Both polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) are reported to be common endocrinopathies. In recent years the number of publications assessing the coexistence of these two disease entities in adult women has been growing. There are many suggestions regarding pathophysiological mechanisms that can cause the relationship between AT and PCOS. However, there is still a lack of research among adolescent girls.

The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence of autoimmune thyroiditis in adolescent girls with PCOS.

Material and methods: The study group included 80 girls diagnosed with PCOS (chronological age: 16.54 ± 1.00 years, BMI: 22.80 ± 3.27 kg/m2), and the control group — 64 regularly menstruating girls (chronological age: 16.71 ± 0.63 years, BMI: 24.8 ± 5.2 kg/m2). The thyroid function and morphology were assessed based on the concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) antibodies and ultrasound scan of the thyroid gland.

Results: AT was diagnosed in 18 (22.5%) girls from the study group and nine (14.06%) from the control group (p > 0.05). Positive anti-TPO titer was observed more often in the study group [21 patients (26.25%)] than in the control group [9 girls (14.06%)] (p = 0.054). Moreover, an abnormal ultrasound scan of the thyroid gland characteristic for AT was found in 18 girls from the study group (22.50%) and 8 girls from the control group (12.50%) (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: The results of the analyzed studies do not confirm a significant relationship between PCOS and AT in adolescent girls. However, in the group of girls with PCOS, autoimmune process exponents were more frequent (anti-TPO), reaching the borderline level of statistical significance.

Abstract

Objectives: Both polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) are reported to be common endocrinopathies. In recent years the number of publications assessing the coexistence of these two disease entities in adult women has been growing. There are many suggestions regarding pathophysiological mechanisms that can cause the relationship between AT and PCOS. However, there is still a lack of research among adolescent girls.

The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence of autoimmune thyroiditis in adolescent girls with PCOS.

Material and methods: The study group included 80 girls diagnosed with PCOS (chronological age: 16.54 ± 1.00 years, BMI: 22.80 ± 3.27 kg/m2), and the control group — 64 regularly menstruating girls (chronological age: 16.71 ± 0.63 years, BMI: 24.8 ± 5.2 kg/m2). The thyroid function and morphology were assessed based on the concentration of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) antibodies and ultrasound scan of the thyroid gland.

Results: AT was diagnosed in 18 (22.5%) girls from the study group and nine (14.06%) from the control group (p > 0.05). Positive anti-TPO titer was observed more often in the study group [21 patients (26.25%)] than in the control group [9 girls (14.06%)] (p = 0.054). Moreover, an abnormal ultrasound scan of the thyroid gland characteristic for AT was found in 18 girls from the study group (22.50%) and 8 girls from the control group (12.50%) (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: The results of the analyzed studies do not confirm a significant relationship between PCOS and AT in adolescent girls. However, in the group of girls with PCOS, autoimmune process exponents were more frequent (anti-TPO), reaching the borderline level of statistical significance.

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Keywords

polycystic ovary syndrome; autoimmune thyroiditis; adolescent girls

About this article
Title

The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-12-29

Page views

556

Article views/downloads

293

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0238

Pubmed

35072232

Keywords

polycystic ovary syndrome
autoimmune thyroiditis
adolescent girls

Authors

Karolina Skrzynska
Agnieszka Zachurzok
Ryszard Tomaszewski
Aneta Gawlik
Ewa Malecka-Tendera

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