open access

Vol 92, No 1 (2021)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-01-29
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The influence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections on the pregnancy course

Julita Nikolajuk-Stasiuk, Tadeusz W. Lapinski
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2020.0139
·
Pubmed: 33576489
·
Ginekol Pol 2021;92(1):30-34.

open access

Vol 92, No 1 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-01-29

Abstract

Objectives: The incidence of HBV infections among the pregnant in Europe falls within the range of 1–7%, whereas it is
1.7–4.3% for HCV.
The aim was to assess the course of pregnancy among women infected with HBV or HCV, and the condition of neonates
in the fifth minute after the birth.
Material and methods: The study included 157 pregnant individuals infected with HBV, 53 infected with HCV, and
330 healthy pregnant women. None of the women infected with HBV and HCV as well as from the control group were
infected with HIV, and none of them took intoxicants.
Results: Weight of neonates delivered by healthy women was higher as compared with children born by women infected
with HBV or HCV (3.517 vs 3.347 and 3.366). The Apgar score of neonates delivered by women with HBV and HCV infections
was lower as compared with the children born by healthy women (9.4 vs 9.3 vs 9.7; p < 0.05). Premature births occurred
more often in HBV and HCV-infected women than in the control group (14.6% and 24.5% vs 6.96%; p < 0.05). Miscarriages
were significantly more common among the patients with HCV infections as compared with the patients who were healthy
(9.4% vs 1.8%; p < 0.05). In comparison with the healthy individuals, this group of patients experienced pruritus (10.5% vs
4.2%; p < 0.05), oedemas (9.4% vs 2.4%; p < 0.05), and hypertension (9.4% vs 1.5%; p < 0.05) more often.
An increase in HBV loads was observed between the 6th and 28th–32nd week of pregnancy among the infected with HBV,
and then, a decrease was observed in the 6th months after the delivery.
Conclusions: The women infected with HBV without HBsAg (–) and the infected with HCV are subject to common incidence
of premature births. Women infected with HCV often experience oedemas, hypertension, and pruritus.

Abstract

Objectives: The incidence of HBV infections among the pregnant in Europe falls within the range of 1–7%, whereas it is
1.7–4.3% for HCV.
The aim was to assess the course of pregnancy among women infected with HBV or HCV, and the condition of neonates
in the fifth minute after the birth.
Material and methods: The study included 157 pregnant individuals infected with HBV, 53 infected with HCV, and
330 healthy pregnant women. None of the women infected with HBV and HCV as well as from the control group were
infected with HIV, and none of them took intoxicants.
Results: Weight of neonates delivered by healthy women was higher as compared with children born by women infected
with HBV or HCV (3.517 vs 3.347 and 3.366). The Apgar score of neonates delivered by women with HBV and HCV infections
was lower as compared with the children born by healthy women (9.4 vs 9.3 vs 9.7; p < 0.05). Premature births occurred
more often in HBV and HCV-infected women than in the control group (14.6% and 24.5% vs 6.96%; p < 0.05). Miscarriages
were significantly more common among the patients with HCV infections as compared with the patients who were healthy
(9.4% vs 1.8%; p < 0.05). In comparison with the healthy individuals, this group of patients experienced pruritus (10.5% vs
4.2%; p < 0.05), oedemas (9.4% vs 2.4%; p < 0.05), and hypertension (9.4% vs 1.5%; p < 0.05) more often.
An increase in HBV loads was observed between the 6th and 28th–32nd week of pregnancy among the infected with HBV,
and then, a decrease was observed in the 6th months after the delivery.
Conclusions: The women infected with HBV without HBsAg (–) and the infected with HCV are subject to common incidence
of premature births. Women infected with HCV often experience oedemas, hypertension, and pruritus.

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Keywords

HBV or HCV infection in pregnancy; childbirth

About this article
Title

The influence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections on the pregnancy course

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 92, No 1 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

30-34

Published online

2021-01-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2020.0139

Pubmed

33576489

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2021;92(1):30-34.

Keywords

HBV or HCV infection in pregnancy
childbirth

Authors

Julita Nikolajuk-Stasiuk
Tadeusz W. Lapinski

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