open access

Vol 90, No 9 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-09-30
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Anti-androgenic therapy in young patients and its impact on intensity of hirsutism, acne, menstrual pain intensity and sexuality — a preliminary study

Anna Fuchs, Aleksandra Matonóg, Paulina Sieradzka, Joanna Pilarska, Aleksandra Hauzer, Iwona Czech, Agnieszka Drosdzol-Cop
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0091
·
Pubmed: 31588549
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(9):520-526.

open access

Vol 90, No 9 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-09-30

Abstract

Objectives: Using anti-androgenic contraception is one of the methods of birth control. It also has a significant, non-contraceptive impact on women’s body. These drugs can be used in various endocrinological disorders, because of their ability to reduce the level of male hormones. The aim of our study is to establish a correlation between taking different types of anti-androgenic drugs and intensity of hirsutism, acne, menstrual pain intensity and sexuality. 

Material and methods: 570 women in childbearing age that had been using oral contraception for at least three months took part in our research. We examined women and asked them about quality of life, health, direct causes and effects of that treatment, intensity of acne and menstrual pain before and after. Our research group has been divided according to the type of gestagen contained in the contraceptive pill: dienogest, cyproterone, chlormadynone and drospirenone. Additionally, the control group consisted of women taking oral contraceptives without antiandrogenic component. 

Results: The mean age of the studied group was 23 years ± 3.23. 225 of 570 women complained of hirsutism. The mean score for acne intensity before the use of contraception was 2.7 ± 1.34. The mean score for acne intensity after 3 months of using contraception was 1.85 ± 1.02 (p < 0.001). 192 women reported excess hairiness in one or more area before treatment. Mean value based on Ferriman-Gallway scale before the treatment was 6.23 ± 6.21 and 5.39 ± 5.6 after the treatment (p < 0.001). 

Conclusions: All groups of drugs effectively reduced pain and acne severity. Cyproterone and drospirenone turned out as the most effective drugs in treating hirsutism. Surprisingly, according to our research, dienogest does not have any impact on body hairiness.

Abstract

Objectives: Using anti-androgenic contraception is one of the methods of birth control. It also has a significant, non-contraceptive impact on women’s body. These drugs can be used in various endocrinological disorders, because of their ability to reduce the level of male hormones. The aim of our study is to establish a correlation between taking different types of anti-androgenic drugs and intensity of hirsutism, acne, menstrual pain intensity and sexuality. 

Material and methods: 570 women in childbearing age that had been using oral contraception for at least three months took part in our research. We examined women and asked them about quality of life, health, direct causes and effects of that treatment, intensity of acne and menstrual pain before and after. Our research group has been divided according to the type of gestagen contained in the contraceptive pill: dienogest, cyproterone, chlormadynone and drospirenone. Additionally, the control group consisted of women taking oral contraceptives without antiandrogenic component. 

Results: The mean age of the studied group was 23 years ± 3.23. 225 of 570 women complained of hirsutism. The mean score for acne intensity before the use of contraception was 2.7 ± 1.34. The mean score for acne intensity after 3 months of using contraception was 1.85 ± 1.02 (p < 0.001). 192 women reported excess hairiness in one or more area before treatment. Mean value based on Ferriman-Gallway scale before the treatment was 6.23 ± 6.21 and 5.39 ± 5.6 after the treatment (p < 0.001). 

Conclusions: All groups of drugs effectively reduced pain and acne severity. Cyproterone and drospirenone turned out as the most effective drugs in treating hirsutism. Surprisingly, according to our research, dienogest does not have any impact on body hairiness.

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Keywords

anti-androgenic therapy; oral contraceptives; acne; hirsutism; menstrual pain; young patients

About this article
Title

Anti-androgenic therapy in young patients and its impact on intensity of hirsutism, acne, menstrual pain intensity and sexuality — a preliminary study

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 9 (2019)

Pages

520-526

Published online

2019-09-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0091

Pubmed

31588549

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(9):520-526.

Keywords

anti-androgenic therapy
oral contraceptives
acne
hirsutism
menstrual pain
young patients

Authors

Anna Fuchs
Aleksandra Matonóg
Paulina Sieradzka
Joanna Pilarska
Aleksandra Hauzer
Iwona Czech
Agnieszka Drosdzol-Cop

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