open access

Vol 90, No 8 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-08-30
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Assessment of selected parameters of placental microstructure in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

Milena Gruszczynska-Losy, Ewa Wender-Ozegowska, Przemyslaw Wirstlein, Malgorzata Szczepanska
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0077
·
Pubmed: 31482548
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(8):452-457.

open access

Vol 90, No 8 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-08-30

Abstract

Objectives: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most common liver disorder during pregnancy. Cholestasis is associated with increased risk of fetal complications: prematurity, perinatal hypoxia and meconium stained amniotic fluid, and sudden intrauterine fetal death. The exact mechanisms associated with cholestasis fetal sequelae are not fully understood. The aim of the study was the histopathological evaluation of placentas from patients with cholestasis and healthy pregnant women to establish whether cholestasis is accompanied by changes in placental microstructure. 

Material and methods: The effect of cholestasis on placental microstructure was investigated using placental tissue from patients with cholestatsis treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Five placental histopathological features were analyzed: number of syncytial knots, number of capillaries per villous, structure of stroma, presence of Hofbauer cells, and villitis of unknown etiology. 

Results: There were no statistically significant differences in any of the studied parameters between cholestasis-affected and healthy control groups. 

Conclusions: There are no diffrences in placental microstructure in cholestasis patients treated with UDCA and in patients with uncomplicated pregnancy.

Abstract

Objectives: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is the most common liver disorder during pregnancy. Cholestasis is associated with increased risk of fetal complications: prematurity, perinatal hypoxia and meconium stained amniotic fluid, and sudden intrauterine fetal death. The exact mechanisms associated with cholestasis fetal sequelae are not fully understood. The aim of the study was the histopathological evaluation of placentas from patients with cholestasis and healthy pregnant women to establish whether cholestasis is accompanied by changes in placental microstructure. 

Material and methods: The effect of cholestasis on placental microstructure was investigated using placental tissue from patients with cholestatsis treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Five placental histopathological features were analyzed: number of syncytial knots, number of capillaries per villous, structure of stroma, presence of Hofbauer cells, and villitis of unknown etiology. 

Results: There were no statistically significant differences in any of the studied parameters between cholestasis-affected and healthy control groups. 

Conclusions: There are no diffrences in placental microstructure in cholestasis patients treated with UDCA and in patients with uncomplicated pregnancy.

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Keywords

intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy; ursodeoxycholic acid; placenta; histology

About this article
Title

Assessment of selected parameters of placental microstructure in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 8 (2019)

Pages

452-457

Published online

2019-08-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0077

Pubmed

31482548

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(8):452-457.

Keywords

intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy
ursodeoxycholic acid
placenta
histology

Authors

Milena Gruszczynska-Losy
Ewa Wender-Ozegowska
Przemyslaw Wirstlein
Malgorzata Szczepanska

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