open access

Vol 93, No 7 (2022)
Review paper
Early publication date: 2022-06-15
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Coffee consumption during pregnancy — what the gynecologist should know? Review of the literature and clinical studies

Stanislaw Surma1, Andrzej Witek1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2022.0061
·
Pubmed: 35894479
·
Ginekol Pol 2022;93(7):591-600.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecological Oncology, University Clinical Hospital, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

open access

Vol 93, No 7 (2022)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Early publication date: 2022-06-15

Abstract

Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world. The impact of coffee consumption on human health has been the subject of many clinical studies and meta-analyses. Taking into account the results of these studies, it can be concluded that coffee has a number of health benefits in terms of the population, including the reduction of the risk of death from any cause. From a clinical point of view, the safety of coffee consumption in a specific subpopulation of pregnant women is important. A large percentage of women continue to consume this drink during pregnancy, while a significant proportion of them exceed the permissible daily dose of caffeine (≤ 200 mg). During pregnancy, the metabolism of caffeine slows down significantly, which prolongs its action and penetrates into the body of the fetus. These biochemical observations have become the driving force behind numerous clinical studies assessing the impact of coffee consumption during pregnancy on its course, complications and the health of the newborn. This review article summarizes the current knowledge of these important issues.

Abstract

Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world. The impact of coffee consumption on human health has been the subject of many clinical studies and meta-analyses. Taking into account the results of these studies, it can be concluded that coffee has a number of health benefits in terms of the population, including the reduction of the risk of death from any cause. From a clinical point of view, the safety of coffee consumption in a specific subpopulation of pregnant women is important. A large percentage of women continue to consume this drink during pregnancy, while a significant proportion of them exceed the permissible daily dose of caffeine (≤ 200 mg). During pregnancy, the metabolism of caffeine slows down significantly, which prolongs its action and penetrates into the body of the fetus. These biochemical observations have become the driving force behind numerous clinical studies assessing the impact of coffee consumption during pregnancy on its course, complications and the health of the newborn. This review article summarizes the current knowledge of these important issues.

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Keywords

coffee; caffeine; pregnancy

About this article
Title

Coffee consumption during pregnancy — what the gynecologist should know? Review of the literature and clinical studies

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 93, No 7 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

591-600

Early publication date

2022-06-15

Page views

283

Article views/downloads

107

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2022.0061

Pubmed

35894479

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2022;93(7):591-600.

Keywords

coffee
caffeine
pregnancy

Authors

Stanislaw Surma
Andrzej Witek

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