open access

Vol 93, No 11 (2022)
Research paper
Published online: 2022-03-22
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Does predelivery body mass index really matter in pregnancy?

Natalia Misan1, Przemyslaw Korszun1, Karolina Gruca-Stryjak1, Katarzyna Paczkowska2, Aleksy Nowak2, Patrycja Wozniak2, Mariola Ropacka-Lesiak1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2022.0005
·
Pubmed: 35325456
·
Ginekol Pol 2022;93(11):922-929.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Poznan University od Medical Sciences, Poland
  2. Students Scientific Association by the Department of Perinatology and Gynecology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 93, No 11 (2022)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2022-03-22

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the perinatal outcome between the normal weight, overweight
and obese pregnant women who delivered in the third-level center of reference. Moreover, the objective was to analyze the usefulness of predelivery body mass index (BMI) in prediction of preterm delivery, prolonged second stage of labor, instrumental vaginal delivery, cesarean section, fetal macrosomia, dystocia and newborn acidosis.

Material and methods: The retrospective study included 2104 patients, divided into three groups, with BMI between
18.5 and 24.9; 25.0 and 29.9; higher than or equal 30.0 kg/m2, respectively. The data were assessed from the medical history.

Results: The predelivery obesity increases the risk of cesarean section (aOR 1.63), macrosomia (aOR 8.89) and dystocia (aOR 3.40) in comparison to normal weight women. Moreover, the obese females had three times greater risk of having a macrosomic child (aOR 3.57) and 1.5 times greater risk of cesarean section (aOR 1.52) than overweight group. The role of predelivery BMI in the prediction of cesarean delivery (AUC 0.550; sensitivity 0.39; specificity 0.71, p < 0.001, cut-off value 28.7 kg/m2), macrosomia (AUC 0.714; sensitivity 0.66; specificity 0.70; p < 0.001, cut-off value 29.0 kg/m2) and dystocia (AUC 0.658; sensitivity 0.77; specificity 0.53, p < 0.001, cut-off value 27.0 kg/m2) was significant.

Conclusions: The predelivery obesity increases the risk of cesarean section, macrosomia and shoulder dystocia and is a useful parameter in the prediction of perinatal outcomes. The establishing cut-off value for predelivery BMI was the lowest in prediction of shoulder dystocia.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the perinatal outcome between the normal weight, overweight
and obese pregnant women who delivered in the third-level center of reference. Moreover, the objective was to analyze the usefulness of predelivery body mass index (BMI) in prediction of preterm delivery, prolonged second stage of labor, instrumental vaginal delivery, cesarean section, fetal macrosomia, dystocia and newborn acidosis.

Material and methods: The retrospective study included 2104 patients, divided into three groups, with BMI between
18.5 and 24.9; 25.0 and 29.9; higher than or equal 30.0 kg/m2, respectively. The data were assessed from the medical history.

Results: The predelivery obesity increases the risk of cesarean section (aOR 1.63), macrosomia (aOR 8.89) and dystocia (aOR 3.40) in comparison to normal weight women. Moreover, the obese females had three times greater risk of having a macrosomic child (aOR 3.57) and 1.5 times greater risk of cesarean section (aOR 1.52) than overweight group. The role of predelivery BMI in the prediction of cesarean delivery (AUC 0.550; sensitivity 0.39; specificity 0.71, p < 0.001, cut-off value 28.7 kg/m2), macrosomia (AUC 0.714; sensitivity 0.66; specificity 0.70; p < 0.001, cut-off value 29.0 kg/m2) and dystocia (AUC 0.658; sensitivity 0.77; specificity 0.53, p < 0.001, cut-off value 27.0 kg/m2) was significant.

Conclusions: The predelivery obesity increases the risk of cesarean section, macrosomia and shoulder dystocia and is a useful parameter in the prediction of perinatal outcomes. The establishing cut-off value for predelivery BMI was the lowest in prediction of shoulder dystocia.

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Keywords

predelivery body mass index; perinatal outcomes; maternal obesity; maternal overweight; newborn weight; cesarean section

About this article
Title

Does predelivery body mass index really matter in pregnancy?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 93, No 11 (2022)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

922-929

Published online

2022-03-22

Page views

1012

Article views/downloads

186

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2022.0005

Pubmed

35325456

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2022;93(11):922-929.

Keywords

predelivery body mass index
perinatal outcomes
maternal obesity
maternal overweight
newborn weight
cesarean section

Authors

Natalia Misan
Przemyslaw Korszun
Karolina Gruca-Stryjak
Katarzyna Paczkowska
Aleksy Nowak
Patrycja Wozniak
Mariola Ropacka-Lesiak

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