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Research paper
Published online: 2021-09-24
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Remission of HPV infection after LEEP-conization — a retrospective study

Marcin Przybylski1, Dominik Pruski1, Sonja Millert-Kalinska1, Andrzej Zmaczynski2, Rafal Baran2, Anna Horbaczewska2, Robert Jach2, Lucja Zaborowska2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0164
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, District Public Hospital in Poznan, Poland
  2. Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Cracow, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-09-24

Abstract

Objectives: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. Long-term exposure to the HPV is a known cause of squamous intraepithelial lesions that consequently lead to cervical cancer development. The loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) conization is an established early cervical cancer treatment method. We aim to assess the remission of HPV infection after LEEP in non-vaccinated patients with pre-cancerous cervical lesions and establish the efficacy of cervical cancer prophylaxis.

Material and methods: We analyzed 31 LEEP conizations performed due to low and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in 2019–2020. We obtained molecular test samples and detected DNA of 37 different HPV genotypes. After a six-month follow-up, each patient underwent subsequent high-risk HPV testing and genotyping.

Results: We observed that 54.8% of qualified patients were infected with HPV 16. We discovered complete viral remission in 64.5% of cases. After surgery, margins were negative in 71% of the patient's samples. During the follow-up, six patients got infected with new strains of HPV.

Conclusions: We found that a correctly performed LEEP conization may contribute to the remission of persistent HPV infection; a more extended follow-up period might be recommended due to a high rate of post-surgery HPV infections.

Abstract

Objectives: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. Long-term exposure to the HPV is a known cause of squamous intraepithelial lesions that consequently lead to cervical cancer development. The loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) conization is an established early cervical cancer treatment method. We aim to assess the remission of HPV infection after LEEP in non-vaccinated patients with pre-cancerous cervical lesions and establish the efficacy of cervical cancer prophylaxis.

Material and methods: We analyzed 31 LEEP conizations performed due to low and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in 2019–2020. We obtained molecular test samples and detected DNA of 37 different HPV genotypes. After a six-month follow-up, each patient underwent subsequent high-risk HPV testing and genotyping.

Results: We observed that 54.8% of qualified patients were infected with HPV 16. We discovered complete viral remission in 64.5% of cases. After surgery, margins were negative in 71% of the patient's samples. During the follow-up, six patients got infected with new strains of HPV.

Conclusions: We found that a correctly performed LEEP conization may contribute to the remission of persistent HPV infection; a more extended follow-up period might be recommended due to a high rate of post-surgery HPV infections.

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Keywords

cervical cancer; loop electrosurgical excision procedure; LEEP; HPV

About this article
Title

Remission of HPV infection after LEEP-conization — a retrospective study

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-09-24

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0164

Keywords

cervical cancer
loop electrosurgical excision procedure
LEEP
HPV

Authors

Marcin Przybylski
Dominik Pruski
Sonja Millert-Kalinska
Andrzej Zmaczynski
Rafal Baran
Anna Horbaczewska
Robert Jach
Lucja Zaborowska

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