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Research paper
Published online: 2021-06-17
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Plasma microRNAs can be a potential diagnostic biomarker for endometriosis

Zhihong Zhuo1, Chuhan Wang1, Huimin Yu1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0127
·
Pubmed: 34155616
Affiliations
  1. HwaMei Hospital, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, China

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-06-17

Abstract

Objectives: Plasma microRNAs are considered potential diagnostic biomarkers for endometriosis. Increasing evidence has shown that a huge number of miRNAs are abnormally expressed in endometriosis plasma and play irreplaceable roles in diagnosis.

Material and methods: The aim of our study was to identify the differential expression of circular miRNA by reviewing the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane databases between normal women and women with endometriosis and analyzing the miRNA data downloaded from the GEO database.

Results: Because of the differential miRNA expression in this review, we evaluated the diagnostic values of the differentially expressed miRNAs, particularly during the menstrual phases. According to the cut-off criteria with |log 2 FC| > 1.0 and P < 0.05, 36 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 upregulated miRNAs and 23 downregulated miRNAs. We developed miR-155, miR-574, miR-23a, and miR-520d via a Venn diagram. Functional enrichment analysis considered that the target miRNAs might be involved in various pathways related to endometriosis, including neurotrophin, Hippo, oocyte meiosis, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, HTLV-Infection, FoxO, and Rap1 signaling pathways. CTNNB1, MYC, and ES R1 of transcription factors were related to the differentially expressed miRNAs.

Conclusions: In summary, our study suggested that a four-miRNA could be included as a prognostic marker in endometriosis.

Abstract

Objectives: Plasma microRNAs are considered potential diagnostic biomarkers for endometriosis. Increasing evidence has shown that a huge number of miRNAs are abnormally expressed in endometriosis plasma and play irreplaceable roles in diagnosis.

Material and methods: The aim of our study was to identify the differential expression of circular miRNA by reviewing the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane databases between normal women and women with endometriosis and analyzing the miRNA data downloaded from the GEO database.

Results: Because of the differential miRNA expression in this review, we evaluated the diagnostic values of the differentially expressed miRNAs, particularly during the menstrual phases. According to the cut-off criteria with |log 2 FC| > 1.0 and P < 0.05, 36 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 upregulated miRNAs and 23 downregulated miRNAs. We developed miR-155, miR-574, miR-23a, and miR-520d via a Venn diagram. Functional enrichment analysis considered that the target miRNAs might be involved in various pathways related to endometriosis, including neurotrophin, Hippo, oocyte meiosis, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, HTLV-Infection, FoxO, and Rap1 signaling pathways. CTNNB1, MYC, and ES R1 of transcription factors were related to the differentially expressed miRNAs.

Conclusions: In summary, our study suggested that a four-miRNA could be included as a prognostic marker in endometriosis.

Get Citation

Keywords

endometriosis; circular; microRNA; diagnosis; plasma

About this article
Title

Plasma microRNAs can be a potential diagnostic biomarker for endometriosis

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-06-17

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0127

Pubmed

34155616

Keywords

endometriosis
circular
microRNA
diagnosis
plasma

Authors

Zhihong Zhuo
Chuhan Wang
Huimin Yu

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