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Research paper
Published online: 2021-04-14
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Comparison of life quality between geriatric patients who underwent reconstructive surgery and obliterative surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

Suna Yıldırım Karaca1, İbrahim Egemen Ertaş1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0040
·
Pubmed: 33914315
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Izmir Tepecik Education and Reseach Hospital, Izmir, Turkey

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-04-14

Abstract

Objectives: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) adversely affects women's quality of life. The aim of this study is to compare the life quality after obliterative surgery and reconstructive surgery for  geriatric patients with advanced pelvic organ prolapse. Material and methods: This matched case control study included sexually inactive women aged 65 years or older who had vaginal surgery for pelvic organ prolapse in Tepecik Education and Research Hospiltal between August 2012 and June 2019. Life quality of women who had undergone obliterative or reconstructive vaginal surgery were evaluated and then compared by Turkish validated prolapse quality of life questionnaire (P-QOL). Patients in obliterative and recontructive surgical procedures were matched according to age, body mass index and POP stage and each group included 49 women. Results: P-QOL scale domains, including prolapse impact (26.6 ± 12.1 vs 34.1 ± 16.2; p = 0.01), physical/social limitations (28.3 ± 12.8 vs 34.8 ± 14.4; p = 0.02) and severity measures (24.9 ± 12.6 vs 30.5 ± 13,4; p = 0.035) revealed significantly lower postoperative deterioration in the obliterative group. No significant difference was found in other P-QOL domains. The mean operation time in the obliterative group was shorter than the reconstructive group (respectively; 69.2 ± 21.5 min, 79.7 ± 29.4, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay and intraoperative complications.  Conclusions: Obliterative surgery is a suitable option in the treatment of advanced pelvic organ prolapse in elderly patients.

Abstract

Objectives: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) adversely affects women's quality of life. The aim of this study is to compare the life quality after obliterative surgery and reconstructive surgery for  geriatric patients with advanced pelvic organ prolapse. Material and methods: This matched case control study included sexually inactive women aged 65 years or older who had vaginal surgery for pelvic organ prolapse in Tepecik Education and Research Hospiltal between August 2012 and June 2019. Life quality of women who had undergone obliterative or reconstructive vaginal surgery were evaluated and then compared by Turkish validated prolapse quality of life questionnaire (P-QOL). Patients in obliterative and recontructive surgical procedures were matched according to age, body mass index and POP stage and each group included 49 women. Results: P-QOL scale domains, including prolapse impact (26.6 ± 12.1 vs 34.1 ± 16.2; p = 0.01), physical/social limitations (28.3 ± 12.8 vs 34.8 ± 14.4; p = 0.02) and severity measures (24.9 ± 12.6 vs 30.5 ± 13,4; p = 0.035) revealed significantly lower postoperative deterioration in the obliterative group. No significant difference was found in other P-QOL domains. The mean operation time in the obliterative group was shorter than the reconstructive group (respectively; 69.2 ± 21.5 min, 79.7 ± 29.4, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay and intraoperative complications.  Conclusions: Obliterative surgery is a suitable option in the treatment of advanced pelvic organ prolapse in elderly patients.

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Keywords

gynecologic surgery; pelvic organ prolapse; quality of life; urogenital prolapse

About this article
Title

Comparison of life quality between geriatric patients who underwent reconstructive surgery and obliterative surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-04-14

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0040

Pubmed

33914315

Keywords

gynecologic surgery
pelvic organ prolapse
quality of life
urogenital prolapse

Authors

Suna Yıldırım Karaca
İbrahim Egemen Ertaş

References (18)
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