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Research paper
Published online: 2021-04-21
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Perinatal outcomes of the antenatally diagnosed omphalocele cases: a single tertiary center experience

Cigdem Akcabay1, Fatma Islek1, Erol Arslan, Masum Kayapinar1, Cansun Demir1, Cuneyt Evruke1, Selim Buyukkurt1, Mete Sucu1, Umran Kucukgoz Gulec1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0071
·
Pubmed: 33914334
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Çukurova University, School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-04-21

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the perinatal outcomes of antenatally diagnosed omphalocele cases.

Material and methods: This was a retrospective study conducted between July 2014 and February 2020 at the prenatal diagnosis center of a university clinic. Gestational week of diagnosis, associated anomalies, karyotype analysis results, complications during pregnancy, termination/delivery characteristics, and postnatal results were evaluated.

Results: The analysis was performed on 58 patients. The median diagnosis time was 14.5 weeks of gestation. Thirty-three cases (57%) were defined in the first trimester. 33 (57%) of 58 patients had one or more concomitant anomalies, while 25 patients (43%) had isolated omphalocele. The most common associated anomaly was a cardiac anomaly which was observed in 17 fetuses (30% of all omphalocele cases). Karyotype analysis was performed in forty-five patients (41 in the prenatal period, 4 in the postnatal period). A normal karyotype was detected in 27 cases (60%). Trisomy 18 was the most common chromosomal anomaly (n = 15, 33.3%). Thirty of 58 patients (52%) requested termination of pregnancy (TOP) in the early pregnancy period. Thirteen of the cases died in-utero (22%). Fifteen pregnancies resulted in live births (26%), of those eight were lost in the first year of life (six of them had additional anomalies, while two of them had isolated omphalocele but the omphalocele pouch was containing the liver in those two babies).

Conclusions: Most of the cases with an omphalocele can be diagnosed in the first trimester. Cardiac anomalies were the most common associated anomalies, while trisomy 18 is the most common chromosomal anomaly. Thus, earlier and effective counseling can be made about the prognosis of pregnancy.

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the perinatal outcomes of antenatally diagnosed omphalocele cases.

Material and methods: This was a retrospective study conducted between July 2014 and February 2020 at the prenatal diagnosis center of a university clinic. Gestational week of diagnosis, associated anomalies, karyotype analysis results, complications during pregnancy, termination/delivery characteristics, and postnatal results were evaluated.

Results: The analysis was performed on 58 patients. The median diagnosis time was 14.5 weeks of gestation. Thirty-three cases (57%) were defined in the first trimester. 33 (57%) of 58 patients had one or more concomitant anomalies, while 25 patients (43%) had isolated omphalocele. The most common associated anomaly was a cardiac anomaly which was observed in 17 fetuses (30% of all omphalocele cases). Karyotype analysis was performed in forty-five patients (41 in the prenatal period, 4 in the postnatal period). A normal karyotype was detected in 27 cases (60%). Trisomy 18 was the most common chromosomal anomaly (n = 15, 33.3%). Thirty of 58 patients (52%) requested termination of pregnancy (TOP) in the early pregnancy period. Thirteen of the cases died in-utero (22%). Fifteen pregnancies resulted in live births (26%), of those eight were lost in the first year of life (six of them had additional anomalies, while two of them had isolated omphalocele but the omphalocele pouch was containing the liver in those two babies).

Conclusions: Most of the cases with an omphalocele can be diagnosed in the first trimester. Cardiac anomalies were the most common associated anomalies, while trisomy 18 is the most common chromosomal anomaly. Thus, earlier and effective counseling can be made about the prognosis of pregnancy.

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Keywords

exomphalos; perinatal outcomes; omphalocele

About this article
Title

Perinatal outcomes of the antenatally diagnosed omphalocele cases: a single tertiary center experience

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-04-21

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0071

Pubmed

33914334

Keywords

exomphalos
perinatal outcomes
omphalocele

Authors

Cigdem Akcabay
Fatma Islek
Erol Arslan
Masum Kayapinar
Cansun Demir
Cuneyt Evruke
Selim Buyukkurt
Mete Sucu
Umran Kucukgoz Gulec

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