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Published online: 2021-05-13
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Serum S100B Protein Concentrations in SGA/FGR newborns

Barbara Strzalko1, Agata Karowicz-Bilinska2, Krystyna Wyka3, Pawel Krajewski4, Marcin Kesiak5, Bozena Kociszewska-Najman1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0119
·
Pubmed: 34105746
Affiliations
  1. Department of Neonatology, Children Clinical Hospital, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  2. Department of Pathology of Pregnancy, Medical University of Lodz, Regional Specialistic Maternity Hospital, Lodz, Poland
  3. Department of Pediatrics, Oncology, Hematology and Diabetology. Laboratory of Immunopathology and Genetics, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  4. Division of Neonatology, First Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  5. Department of Neonatology, Regional Specialistic Maternity Hospital, Lodz, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-05-13

Abstract

Objectives: Fetal growth restriction is associated with chronic fetal hypoxia, poor perinatal outcome and increased perinatal mortality. There are no reliable methods to detect cell damage in the central nervous system (CNS) in these patients. The findings of increased an acidic calcium-binding protein (S100B) concentration in biological fluids of infants after brain injury have supported the use of S100B as a biochemical marker of CNS damage.

The purpose of the study was to assess blood S100B concentrations in small for gestational age (SGA) and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) newborns and to evaluate the usefulness of S100B for early detection of hypoxia.

Material and methods: The investigation was carried out between November 2011 and April 2014. Serum S100B protein level was assessed in cord blood collected from newborns after birth. Medical records of mothers of neonates studied were reviewed for pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), preeclampsia, maternal smoking during pregnancy and abnormalities in umbilical artery (UA) Doppler ultrasound examination.

Results: The study was carried out in 88 SGA neonates and 80 AGA neonates. The median value of S100B protein concentration in the SGA study group was significantly higher than in AGA controls (p < 0.001). Cord blood serum S100B concentration in SGA neonates with prenatal normal UA Doppler ultrasound findings (n = 32) did not differ from that SGA neonates with abnormal prenatal UA Doppler findings (n = 25) (p = 0.74), but was significantly higher than in AGA newborns (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Elevated S100B protein levels in cord blood collected from SGA newborns may be helpful in detecting infants at higher risk of postnatal neurologic disturbances at an early stage.

Abstract

Objectives: Fetal growth restriction is associated with chronic fetal hypoxia, poor perinatal outcome and increased perinatal mortality. There are no reliable methods to detect cell damage in the central nervous system (CNS) in these patients. The findings of increased an acidic calcium-binding protein (S100B) concentration in biological fluids of infants after brain injury have supported the use of S100B as a biochemical marker of CNS damage.

The purpose of the study was to assess blood S100B concentrations in small for gestational age (SGA) and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) newborns and to evaluate the usefulness of S100B for early detection of hypoxia.

Material and methods: The investigation was carried out between November 2011 and April 2014. Serum S100B protein level was assessed in cord blood collected from newborns after birth. Medical records of mothers of neonates studied were reviewed for pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), preeclampsia, maternal smoking during pregnancy and abnormalities in umbilical artery (UA) Doppler ultrasound examination.

Results: The study was carried out in 88 SGA neonates and 80 AGA neonates. The median value of S100B protein concentration in the SGA study group was significantly higher than in AGA controls (p < 0.001). Cord blood serum S100B concentration in SGA neonates with prenatal normal UA Doppler ultrasound findings (n = 32) did not differ from that SGA neonates with abnormal prenatal UA Doppler findings (n = 25) (p = 0.74), but was significantly higher than in AGA newborns (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Elevated S100B protein levels in cord blood collected from SGA newborns may be helpful in detecting infants at higher risk of postnatal neurologic disturbances at an early stage.

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Keywords

S100B protein; biomarker; SGA; FGR, newborn; fetal hypoxia; CNS; neurological damage

About this article
Title

Serum S100B Protein Concentrations in SGA/FGR newborns

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-05-13

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0119

Pubmed

34105746

Keywords

S100B protein
biomarker
SGA
FGR
newborn
fetal hypoxia
CNS
neurological damage

Authors

Barbara Strzalko
Agata Karowicz-Bilinska
Krystyna Wyka
Pawel Krajewski
Marcin Kesiak
Bozena Kociszewska-Najman

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