open access

Vol 92, No 6 (2021)
Review paper
Published online: 2021-04-29
Get Citation

Vitamin D3 and its receptor in selected obstetrical complications

Justyna Magielda-Stola1, Krzysztof Drews1, Hubert Wolski12, Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0088
·
Pubmed: 33914313
·
Ginekol Pol 2021;92(6):460-465.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Perinatology and Women’s Disease, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  2. Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Zakopane, Poland

open access

Vol 92, No 6 (2021)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-04-29

Abstract

Vitamin D3 (VD3) and its steroidal nuclear receptor are necessary for proper development of a pregnancy. They play a key role in implantation, modulate the mother’s immune response to the developing fetus, influence the final development of a placenta, and regulate blood pressure and glucose tolerance. VD3 deficiency can lead to the occurrence of obstetric complications such as recurrent miscarriages, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes and preterm labor. VD3 deficiency is a common phenomenon across the globe; because of the higher demand placed on their bodies, pregnant women are more likely to develop VD3 deficiency. During pregnancy, VD3 supplementation is a safe method of treatment without risk of side effects or intoxication. To obtain the greatest efficacy, VD3 supplementation should start at the pregnancy planning stage, under control of the VD3 serum concentration, which should exceed 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L); this is to start the positive effect of the optimal VD3 concentration from the beginning of a pregnancy.

Abstract

Vitamin D3 (VD3) and its steroidal nuclear receptor are necessary for proper development of a pregnancy. They play a key role in implantation, modulate the mother’s immune response to the developing fetus, influence the final development of a placenta, and regulate blood pressure and glucose tolerance. VD3 deficiency can lead to the occurrence of obstetric complications such as recurrent miscarriages, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, gestational diabetes and preterm labor. VD3 deficiency is a common phenomenon across the globe; because of the higher demand placed on their bodies, pregnant women are more likely to develop VD3 deficiency. During pregnancy, VD3 supplementation is a safe method of treatment without risk of side effects or intoxication. To obtain the greatest efficacy, VD3 supplementation should start at the pregnancy planning stage, under control of the VD3 serum concentration, which should exceed 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L); this is to start the positive effect of the optimal VD3 concentration from the beginning of a pregnancy.

Get Citation

Keywords

vitamin D; VDR; pregnancy complications

About this article
Title

Vitamin D3 and its receptor in selected obstetrical complications

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 92, No 6 (2021)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

460-465

Published online

2021-04-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0088

Pubmed

33914313

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2021;92(6):460-465.

Keywords

vitamin D
VDR
pregnancy complications

Authors

Justyna Magielda-Stola
Krzysztof Drews
Hubert Wolski
Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz

References (52)
  1. Holick MF. The vitamin D deficiency pandemic: Approaches for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Rev Endocr Metab Disord. 2017; 18(2): 153–165.
  2. Mendes MM, Darling AL, Hart KH, et al. Impact of high latitude, urban living and ethnicity on 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: A need for multidisciplinary action? J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2019; 188: 95–102.
  3. Płudowski P, Ducki C, Konstantynowicz J, et al. Vitamin D status in Poland. Pol Arch Med Wewn. 2016; 126(7–8): 530–539.
  4. Weisman Y. Maternal, fetal and neonatal vitamin D and calcium metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. Endocr Dev. 2003; 6: 34–49.
  5. Díaz L, Sánchez I, Avila E, et al. Identification of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 1alpha-hydroxylase gene transcription product in cultures of human syncytiotrophoblast cells. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000; 85(7): 2543–2549.
  6. Chan SY, Susarla R, Canovas D, et al. Vitamin D promotes human extravillous trophoblast invasion in vitro. Placenta. 2015; 36(4): 403–409.
  7. Zehnder D, Evans KN, Kilby MD, et al. The ontogeny of 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) 1alpha-hydroxylase expression in human placenta and decidua. Am J Pathol. 2002; 161(1): 105–114.
  8. Barrera D, Avila E, Hernandez G, et al. Calcitriol affects hCG gene transcription in cultured human syncytiotrophoblasts. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2008; 6: 3.
  9. Barrera D, Avila E, Hernández G, et al. Estradiol and progesterone synthesis in human placenta is stimulated by calcitriol. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007; 103(3–5): 529–532.
  10. King K, Smith S, Chapman M, et al. Detailed analysis of peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells in women with recurrent miscarriage. Hum Reprod. 2010; 25(1): 52–58.
  11. Lim KJ, Odukoya OA, Ajjan RA, et al. The role of T-helper cytokines in human reproduction. Fertil Steril. 2000; 73(1): 136–142.
  12. Chu J, Gallos I, Tobias A, et al. Vitamin D and assisted reproductive treatment outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Hum Reprod. 2018; 33(1): 65–80.
  13. Ota K, Dambaeva S, Han AR, et al. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for recurrent pregnancy losses by increasing cellular immunity and autoimmunity. Hum Reprod. 2014; 29(2): 208–219.
  14. Chen X, Yin B, Lian RC, et al. Modulatory effects of vitamin D on peripheral cellular immunity in patients with recurrent miscarriage. Am J Reprod Immunol. 2016; 76(6): 432–438.
  15. Tavakoli M, Jeddi-Tehrani M, Salek-Moghaddam A, et al. Effects of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 on cytokine production by endometrial cells of women with recurrent spontaneous abortion. Fertil Steril. 2011; 96(3): 751–757.
  16. Li N, Wu HM, Hang F, et al. Women with recurrent spontaneous abortion have decreased 25(OH) vitamin D and VDR at the fetal-maternal interface. Braz J Med Biol Res. 2017; 50(11): e6527.
  17. Yan X, Wang L, Yan C, et al. Decreased expression of the vitamin D receptor in women with recurrent pregnancy loss. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2016; 606: 128–133.
  18. Bender Atik R, Christiansen OB, Elson J, et al. ESHRE Guideline Group on RPL. ESHRE guideline: recurrent pregnancy loss. Hum Reprod Open. 2018; 2018(2): hoy004.
  19. Rylander A, Lindqvist PG. Eclampsia is more prevalent during the winter season in Sweden. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011; 90(1): 114–117.
  20. Akbari S, Khodadadi B, Ahmadi SA, et al. Association of vitamin D level and vitamin D deficiency with risk of preeclampsia: A systematic review and updated meta-analysis. Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2018; 57(2): 241–247.
  21. Li YC. Vitamin D regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. J Cell Biochem. 2003; 88(2): 327–331.
  22. Tomaschitz A, Pilz S, Ritz E, et al. Independent association between 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the renin-angiotensin system: The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study. Clin Chim Acta. 2010; 411(17–18): 1354–1360.
  23. Ma R, Gu Y, Zhao S, et al. Expressions of vitamin D metabolic components VDBP, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, and VDR in placentas from normal and preeclamptic pregnancies. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2012; 303(7): E928–E935.
  24. Fogacci S, Fogacci F, Banach M, et al. Lipid and Blood Pressure Meta-analysis Collaboration (LBPMC) Group. Vitamin D supplementation and incident preeclampsia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Clin Nutr. 2020; 39(6): 1742–1752.
  25. Palacios C, Kostiuk LK, Peña-Rosas JP. Vitamin D supplementation for women during pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2019; 7: CD008873.
  26. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Vitamin D in pregnancy. Scientific Impact Paper. 2014; 31(43).
  27. Nguyen TPH, Yong HEJ, Chollangi T, et al. Placental vitamin D receptor expression is decreased in human idiopathic fetal growth restriction. J Mol Med (Berl). 2015; 93(7): 795–805.
  28. Hajianfar H, Esmailzadeh A, Feizi A, et al. Association of maternal serum vitamin D level with risk of pregnancy-related complications and neonatal anthropometric measures: a prospective observational study. Int J Prev Med. 2019; 10: 208.
  29. Gernand AD, Simhan HN, Klebanoff MA, et al. Maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and measures of newborn and placental weight in a U.S. multicenter cohort study. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013; 98(1): 398–404.
  30. Wei SQ, Qi HP, Luo ZC, et al. Maternal vitamin D status and adverse pregnancy outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2013; 26(9): 889–899.
  31. Eggemoen ÅR, Jenum AK, Mdala I, et al. Vitamin D levels during pregnancy and associations with birth weight and body composition of the newborn: a longitudinal multiethnic population-based study. Br J Nutr. 2017; 117(7): 985–993.
  32. Roth DE, Leung M, Mesfin E, et al. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: state of the evidence from a systematic review of randomised trials. BMJ. 2017; 359: j5237.
  33. Bi WG, Nuyt AM, Weiler H, et al. Association between vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy and offspring growth, morbidity, and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatr. 2018; 172(7): 635–645.
  34. Roth DE, Morris SK, Zlotkin S, et al. Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy and lactation and infant growth. N Engl J Med. 2018; 379(6): 535–546.
  35. Chiu KC, Chu A, Go VL, et al. Hypovitaminosis D is associated with insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004; 79(5): 820–825.
  36. Knabl J, Hüttenbrenner R, Hutter S, et al. Gestational diabetes mellitus upregulates vitamin D receptor in extravillous trophoblasts and fetoplacental endothelial cells. Reprod Sci. 2015; 22(3): 358–366.
  37. Zhang Y, Gong Y, Xue H, et al. Vitamin D and gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review based on data free of Hawthorne effect. BJOG. 2018; 125(7): 784–793.
  38. Palacios C, De-Regil LM, Lombardo LK, et al. Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: Updated meta-analysis on maternal outcomes. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2016; 164: 148–155.
  39. Adams JS, Hewison M. Unexpected actions of vitamin D: new perspectives on the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2008; 4(2): 80–90.
  40. McDonnell SL, Baggerly KA, Baggerly CA, et al. Maternal 25(OH)D concentrations ≥ 40 ng/mL associated with 60% lower preterm birth risk among general obstetrical patients at an urban medical center. PLoS One. 2017; 12(7): e0180483.
  41. Zhou SS, Tao YH, Huang K, et al. Vitamin D and risk of preterm birth: Up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and observational studies. J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2017; 43(2): 247–256.
  42. Purisch SE, Gyamfi-Bannerman C. Epidemiology of preterm birth. Semin Perinatol. 2017; 41(7): 387–391.
  43. Yao S, Hong CC, Bandera EV, et al. Demographic, lifestyle, and genetic determinants of circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and vitamin D-binding protein in African American and European American women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017; 105(6): 1362–1371.
  44. Hollis BW, Wagner CL, Howard CR, et al. Maternal versus infant vitamin D supplementation during lactation: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2015; 136(4): 625–634.
  45. Eroglu S, Karatas G, Aziz V, et al. Evaluation of bone mineral density and its associated factors in postpartum women. Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol. 2019; 58(6): 801–804.
  46. Holick MF, Binkley NC, Bischoff-Ferrari HA, et al. Endocrine Society. Evaluation, treatment, and prevention of vitamin D deficiency: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011; 96(7): 1911–1930.
  47. Zimmer M, Sieroszewski P, Oszukowski P, et al. Rekomendacje Polskiego Towarzystwa Ginekologów i Położników dotyczące suplementacji u kobiet ciężarnych. https://www.ptgin.pl/sites/default/files/page-2020/REKOMENDACJE%20PTGIP%20SUPLEMENTY%20W%20CI%C4%84%C5%BBY%202020-07-28%20bo.pdf (2020-07-08).
  48. Ross A, Manson J, Abrams S, et al. The 2011 report on dietary reference intakes for calcium and vitamin D from the Institute of Medicine: what clinicians need to know. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2011; 96(1): 53–58.
  49. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Vitamin D: screening and supplementation during pregnancy. Committee Opinion. 2011; 495.
  50. Koletzko B, Bauer CP, Bung P, et al. German national consensus recommendations on nutrition and lifestyle in pregnancy by the 'Healthy Start - Young Family Network'. Ann Nutr Metab. 2013; 63(4): 311–322.
  51. SACN vitamin D and health report. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sacn-vitamin-d-and-health-report (2020-12-15).
  52. WHO antenatal care recommendations for a positive pregnancy experience. Nutritional interventions update: Vitamin D supplements during pregnancy Geneva, 2020.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl