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Research paper
Published online: 2021-04-22
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Relationships between hormonal parameters, body fat distribution and bone mineral density in women with psychogenic functional hypothalamic amenorrhea

Justyna Syrenicz1, Mariola Krzyscin23, Elzbieta Sowinska-Przepiera2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0041
·
Pubmed: 33914322
Affiliations
  1. Department of Diabetology and Internal Medicine, Pomeranian Medical University, Police, Poland
  2. Department of Endocrinology, Metabolic and Internal Diseases, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
  3. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Frankfurt (Oder), Germany

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-04-22

Abstract

Objectives: Available evidence implies that unfavorable changes in the distribution of adipose tissue resulting from hormonal imbalance associated with ovarian insufficiency might influence bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of our study was to verify if volumes of visceral (VAT), female (FAT) and android (AAT) body fat as determined by densitometry determined influence BMD in women with functional menstrual disorders, and if these correlates some endocrine factors. Material and methods: We examined 293 women (mean age 26.7 ± 4.4 years) who have had psychogenic type of functional hypothalamic secondary amenorrhea for at least three months (mean 5.82 ± 0.94). A variety of hormonal tests, determination of BMD and both distribution and volume of adipose tissue were performed. Results: Volume of adipose tissue in all analyzed body regions indicated a positive correlation with BMD in lumbar spine (VAT: R = 0.277, FAT: R = 0.345, AAT: R = 0.336) and entire skeleton (VAT: R = 0.453, FAT: R = 0.527, AAT: R = 0.529). BMD in both the lumbar spine and entire skeleton had positive correlation with body mass index (R = 0.380 and R = 0.599, respectively) and free androgen index values (R = 0.150 and R = 0.279). It showed a negative correlation with sex hormone-binding globulin (R = –0.191 and R = –0.326). We did not find a parameter that could be an independent predictor of BMD. Conclusions: Distribution of body fat is only one of numerous determinants of BMD in women with functional menstrual disorders and should not be treated as the only predictor for bone mass deficiency. Determination of adipose tissue distribution in these patients has probably minor clinical impact.

Abstract

Objectives: Available evidence implies that unfavorable changes in the distribution of adipose tissue resulting from hormonal imbalance associated with ovarian insufficiency might influence bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of our study was to verify if volumes of visceral (VAT), female (FAT) and android (AAT) body fat as determined by densitometry determined influence BMD in women with functional menstrual disorders, and if these correlates some endocrine factors. Material and methods: We examined 293 women (mean age 26.7 ± 4.4 years) who have had psychogenic type of functional hypothalamic secondary amenorrhea for at least three months (mean 5.82 ± 0.94). A variety of hormonal tests, determination of BMD and both distribution and volume of adipose tissue were performed. Results: Volume of adipose tissue in all analyzed body regions indicated a positive correlation with BMD in lumbar spine (VAT: R = 0.277, FAT: R = 0.345, AAT: R = 0.336) and entire skeleton (VAT: R = 0.453, FAT: R = 0.527, AAT: R = 0.529). BMD in both the lumbar spine and entire skeleton had positive correlation with body mass index (R = 0.380 and R = 0.599, respectively) and free androgen index values (R = 0.150 and R = 0.279). It showed a negative correlation with sex hormone-binding globulin (R = –0.191 and R = –0.326). We did not find a parameter that could be an independent predictor of BMD. Conclusions: Distribution of body fat is only one of numerous determinants of BMD in women with functional menstrual disorders and should not be treated as the only predictor for bone mass deficiency. Determination of adipose tissue distribution in these patients has probably minor clinical impact.

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Keywords

estrogens; visceral fat; subcutaneous fat; amenorrhea; mineralization

About this article
Title

Relationships between hormonal parameters, body fat distribution and bone mineral density in women with psychogenic functional hypothalamic amenorrhea

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-04-22

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0041

Pubmed

33914322

Keywords

estrogens
visceral fat
subcutaneous fat
amenorrhea
mineralization

Authors

Justyna Syrenicz
Mariola Krzyscin
Elzbieta Sowinska-Przepiera

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