Ginekologia Polska

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Published online: 2021-05-13
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The role of oligohydramnios and fetal growth restriction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in preeclamptic patients

Gülten Özgen1, Burcu Dincgez Cakmak1, Levent Özgen2, Seren Uguz1, Hakan Sager1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0094
·
Pubmed: 34105748
Affiliations
  1. Bursa Yüksek İhtisas Training and Research Hospital Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bursa, Turkey
  2. Bursa City Hospital, T.c. Sağlık Bakanlığı Bursa Şehir Hastanesi, Bursa, Turkey

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-05-13

Abstract

Objectives: We aimed to compare perinatal outcomes of oligohydramnios or fetal growth restriction with normal amniotic fluid index and fetal growth in preeclampsia and to compare the outcomes of only oligohydramnios, only fetal growth restriction and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction preeclamptic groups.

Material and methods: A total of 743 preeclamptic patients were evaluated between June 2016 and 2020. Patients were divided into two groups: preeclampsia with oligohydramnios or fetal growth restriction (n = 237) and preeclampsia with normal amniotic fluid index and fetal growth (n = 506). Then, the first group was divided subgroups as only oligohydramnios (n = 55), only fetal growth restriction (n = 125) and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction (n = 57). Demographic characteristics and perinatal outcomes were recorded.

Results: Gestational age at delivery (p < 0.001), birth weight (p < 0.001), Apgar scores (p < 0.001) and eclampsia (p < 0.001) were lower whereas impaired doppler findings (p < 0.001), cesarean rates (p < 0.001), preterm delivery (p < 0.001), abruptio placenta (p < 0.001), acute fetal distress (p < 0.001), RDS (p < 0.001), NICU requirement (p < 0.001) and neonatal death (p < 0.001) were higher in oligohydramnios or fetal growth restriction preeclamptic group. In subgroup analysis, there were differences between three groups according to the gestational age (p < 0.001), cesarean rates (p = 0.002), preterm delivery (p < 0.001), intensive care unit requirement (p = 0.039), birth weight (p < 0.001), Apgar scores (p < 0.001), RDS (p < 0.001) and NICU requirement (p < 0.001). In pairwise comparison, there was significant difference between only oligohydramnios and only fetal growth restriction group and between only oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction group according to birth weight, Apgar scores, preterm delivery and cesarean rates, presence of RDS, maternal and neonatal intensive care unit requirement. No significant difference was detected between only fetal growth restriction group and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction group in terms of all parameters.

Conclusions: We suggest that patients with only oligohydramniosis have more favorable pregnancy outcomes than pregnants with only fetal growth restriction and coexistence of two conditions in preeclamptic patients. We claim that it could be appropriate to recommend close monitorization in preeclamptic patients with only fetal growth restriction and oligohydramniosis and fetal growth restriction.

Abstract

Objectives: We aimed to compare perinatal outcomes of oligohydramnios or fetal growth restriction with normal amniotic fluid index and fetal growth in preeclampsia and to compare the outcomes of only oligohydramnios, only fetal growth restriction and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction preeclamptic groups.

Material and methods: A total of 743 preeclamptic patients were evaluated between June 2016 and 2020. Patients were divided into two groups: preeclampsia with oligohydramnios or fetal growth restriction (n = 237) and preeclampsia with normal amniotic fluid index and fetal growth (n = 506). Then, the first group was divided subgroups as only oligohydramnios (n = 55), only fetal growth restriction (n = 125) and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction (n = 57). Demographic characteristics and perinatal outcomes were recorded.

Results: Gestational age at delivery (p < 0.001), birth weight (p < 0.001), Apgar scores (p < 0.001) and eclampsia (p < 0.001) were lower whereas impaired doppler findings (p < 0.001), cesarean rates (p < 0.001), preterm delivery (p < 0.001), abruptio placenta (p < 0.001), acute fetal distress (p < 0.001), RDS (p < 0.001), NICU requirement (p < 0.001) and neonatal death (p < 0.001) were higher in oligohydramnios or fetal growth restriction preeclamptic group. In subgroup analysis, there were differences between three groups according to the gestational age (p < 0.001), cesarean rates (p = 0.002), preterm delivery (p < 0.001), intensive care unit requirement (p = 0.039), birth weight (p < 0.001), Apgar scores (p < 0.001), RDS (p < 0.001) and NICU requirement (p < 0.001). In pairwise comparison, there was significant difference between only oligohydramnios and only fetal growth restriction group and between only oligohydramnios and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction group according to birth weight, Apgar scores, preterm delivery and cesarean rates, presence of RDS, maternal and neonatal intensive care unit requirement. No significant difference was detected between only fetal growth restriction group and oligohydramnios with fetal growth restriction group in terms of all parameters.

Conclusions: We suggest that patients with only oligohydramniosis have more favorable pregnancy outcomes than pregnants with only fetal growth restriction and coexistence of two conditions in preeclamptic patients. We claim that it could be appropriate to recommend close monitorization in preeclamptic patients with only fetal growth restriction and oligohydramniosis and fetal growth restriction.

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Keywords

adverse pregnancy outcome; fetal growth restriction; oligohydramnios; preeclampsia

About this article
Title

The role of oligohydramnios and fetal growth restriction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in preeclamptic patients

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-05-13

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0094

Pubmed

34105748

Keywords

adverse pregnancy outcome
fetal growth restriction
oligohydramnios
preeclampsia

Authors

Gülten Özgen
Burcu Dincgez Cakmak
Levent Özgen
Seren Uguz
Hakan Sager

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