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Research paper
Published online: 2021-06-24
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Effect of cord clamping time on neonatal vitamin B12, folate and urinary iodine concentration

Özgül Özgan Çelikel1, Nilgün Altuntaş2, Nurkan Aksoy2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0115
·
Pubmed: 34263919
Affiliations
  1. Lokman Hekim Univercity, Bağlıca mah. Bağlıca Bulvarı Eskiçayır Cad. Afşaroğlu Konakları, Ankara, Turkey
  2. Ankara Yıldırım Beyazıt University Faculty of Medicine, Turkey

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-06-24

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this randomised study was to investigate whether early or late clamping of the cord influences the status of micro-elements and thyroid hormone levels in newborns.

Material and methods: The study participants were randomised into two groups: Group 1, in which cord clamping was performed within 10 s (n = 32) and Group 2, in which clamping was performed at the 60th second (n = 28). Sociodemographic parameters were recorded; maternal and neonatal levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulant hormone (TSH), urinary iodine concentration levels (UIC) folate and vitamin B12 were measured.

Results: Of the maternal and neonatal thyroid hormone values examined, a significant difference was determined between the groups only in respect of the FT4 and FT3 values of the newborns in the first 24 hours (p = 0.037, p = 0.009, respectively). The FT4 values in the first 24 hours were determined to be lower than normal in 15.6% (n: 5) of the newborns in Group 1 and in 0% of Group 2. The FT3 values in the first 24 hours were determined to be lower than normal in 62.5% (n: 20) of the newborns in Group 1 and in 28.5% of Group 2. Vitamin B12 values below the normal limit were determined at a significantly higher rate in Group 1 (p = 0.009). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the maternal and neonatal vitamin B12 levels (r: 0.334, p = 0.009).

Conclusions: Late clamping of the umbilical cord may contribute to erythrocyte synthesis by allowing passage of vitamins such as B12 and folic acid to the newborn.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this randomised study was to investigate whether early or late clamping of the cord influences the status of micro-elements and thyroid hormone levels in newborns.

Material and methods: The study participants were randomised into two groups: Group 1, in which cord clamping was performed within 10 s (n = 32) and Group 2, in which clamping was performed at the 60th second (n = 28). Sociodemographic parameters were recorded; maternal and neonatal levels of free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulant hormone (TSH), urinary iodine concentration levels (UIC) folate and vitamin B12 were measured.

Results: Of the maternal and neonatal thyroid hormone values examined, a significant difference was determined between the groups only in respect of the FT4 and FT3 values of the newborns in the first 24 hours (p = 0.037, p = 0.009, respectively). The FT4 values in the first 24 hours were determined to be lower than normal in 15.6% (n: 5) of the newborns in Group 1 and in 0% of Group 2. The FT3 values in the first 24 hours were determined to be lower than normal in 62.5% (n: 20) of the newborns in Group 1 and in 28.5% of Group 2. Vitamin B12 values below the normal limit were determined at a significantly higher rate in Group 1 (p = 0.009). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the maternal and neonatal vitamin B12 levels (r: 0.334, p = 0.009).

Conclusions: Late clamping of the umbilical cord may contribute to erythrocyte synthesis by allowing passage of vitamins such as B12 and folic acid to the newborn.

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Keywords

cord clamping; vitamin B12; folate; urinary iodine concentration

About this article
Title

Effect of cord clamping time on neonatal vitamin B12, folate and urinary iodine concentration

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-06-24

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0115

Pubmed

34263919

Keywords

cord clamping
vitamin B12
folate
urinary iodine concentration

Authors

Özgül Özgan Çelikel
Nilgün Altuntaş
Nurkan Aksoy

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