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Research paper
Published online: 2021-05-13
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Perinatal and neonatal outcome in patients with preeclampsia

Katarzyna A. Stefanska1, Maciej Zielinski2, Joanna Jassem-Bobowicz3, Dorota Zamkowska1, Przemyslaw Adamski1, Karolina Piekarska2, Martyna Jankowiak2, Katarzyna Leszczynska1, Renata Swiatkowska-Stodulska4, Krzysztof Preis1, Piotr Trzonkowski2, Natalia Marek-Trzonkowska5
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0101
·
Pubmed: 34105747
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics, Medical University of Gdansk, Poland
  2. Department of Medical Immunology, Medical University of Gdansk, Poland
  3. Department of Neonatology Medical University of Gdansk, Poland
  4. Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Medical University of Gdansk, Poland
  5. International Centre for Cancer Vaccine Science Cancer Immunology Group, University of Gdansk, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-05-13

Abstract

Objectives: Preeclampsia (PE) affects 2–5% of pregnant women. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes.

Material and methods: This study included 88 women showing gestational hypertension (GH) or PE symptoms, and their newborns.

Results: The rate of FGR was 43% for mothers with PE, compared to 8% with GH. The association was significant, p = < 0.001 but with moderate strength, Cramer’s V = 0.40. The risk of FGR increased nine times when PE occurred, as the odds ratio was 9.25 (CI: 2.46–34.83), p = 0.001. PE was associated with FGR risk if delivery time was less than 34 weeks compared to a delivery time of more than 34 weeks. This was 82% of FGR cases for < 34 weeks, compared with 35% of cases in > 34 group, (p = 0.001; Cramer’s V = 0.50). PE was also associated (p = 0.01, Cramer’s V = 0.27) with the type of delivery, as the caesarean section rate was 74%, compared to 50% in the GH group. This made it three times higher the likelihood of delivery by caesarean section, as the odds ratio was 3.10 (CI: 1.24–7.75), p=0,02. Delivery time was significantly (p < 0.001) shortened to 38 weeks (27–41), compared to 40 weeks (38–42) GH mothers. There was no distinction in median age for PE and GH mothers (p = 0.124). The overall clinical status of neonates was proportional despite the mother’s PE. The sum of Apgar points in the first, and then the second to third minute, did not differ significantly, p = 0.370 and 0.560, respectively. The number of peripheral blood platelets and leucocytes was not reduced (p = 0.821 and 0.534) in infants when the mother suffered from PE.

Conclusions: The prediction of adverse maternal outcomes from hypertensive diseases of pregnancy is key to optimal management, including the timing of delivery and planning for the most appropriate place of care. 

Abstract

Objectives: Preeclampsia (PE) affects 2–5% of pregnant women. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes.

Material and methods: This study included 88 women showing gestational hypertension (GH) or PE symptoms, and their newborns.

Results: The rate of FGR was 43% for mothers with PE, compared to 8% with GH. The association was significant, p = < 0.001 but with moderate strength, Cramer’s V = 0.40. The risk of FGR increased nine times when PE occurred, as the odds ratio was 9.25 (CI: 2.46–34.83), p = 0.001. PE was associated with FGR risk if delivery time was less than 34 weeks compared to a delivery time of more than 34 weeks. This was 82% of FGR cases for < 34 weeks, compared with 35% of cases in > 34 group, (p = 0.001; Cramer’s V = 0.50). PE was also associated (p = 0.01, Cramer’s V = 0.27) with the type of delivery, as the caesarean section rate was 74%, compared to 50% in the GH group. This made it three times higher the likelihood of delivery by caesarean section, as the odds ratio was 3.10 (CI: 1.24–7.75), p=0,02. Delivery time was significantly (p < 0.001) shortened to 38 weeks (27–41), compared to 40 weeks (38–42) GH mothers. There was no distinction in median age for PE and GH mothers (p = 0.124). The overall clinical status of neonates was proportional despite the mother’s PE. The sum of Apgar points in the first, and then the second to third minute, did not differ significantly, p = 0.370 and 0.560, respectively. The number of peripheral blood platelets and leucocytes was not reduced (p = 0.821 and 0.534) in infants when the mother suffered from PE.

Conclusions: The prediction of adverse maternal outcomes from hypertensive diseases of pregnancy is key to optimal management, including the timing of delivery and planning for the most appropriate place of care. 

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Keywords

preeclampsia; gestational hypertension; complications; neonates; perinatal outcome; neonatal outcome

About this article
Title

Perinatal and neonatal outcome in patients with preeclampsia

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-05-13

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0101

Pubmed

34105747

Keywords

preeclampsia
gestational hypertension
complications
neonates
perinatal outcome
neonatal outcome

Authors

Katarzyna A. Stefanska
Maciej Zielinski
Joanna Jassem-Bobowicz
Dorota Zamkowska
Przemyslaw Adamski
Karolina Piekarska
Martyna Jankowiak
Katarzyna Leszczynska
Renata Swiatkowska-Stodulska
Krzysztof Preis
Piotr Trzonkowski
Natalia Marek-Trzonkowska

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