open access

Vol 92, No 8 (2021)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-04-06
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Ovarian reserve assessment in crohn patients of reproductive age

Pinar Kadirogullari1, Pinar Yalcin Bahat2, Fitnat Topbas Selcuki2, Kader Irak3, Kerem Doga Seckin2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2020.0170
·
Pubmed: 33844252
·
Ginekol Pol 2021;92(8):550-555.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Acıbadem University Atakent Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Health Sciences University Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Suam, Istanbul, Turkey
  3. Department of Gastroenterology, Istanbul Health Sciences University, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Research and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

open access

Vol 92, No 8 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-04-06

Abstract

Objectives: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a repeating bowel disease characterized by remission and exacerbation periods. The disease mostly affects adults of reproductive age. Women with desires to conceive are concerned about the effects of CD on their fertility. To demonstrate the relationship between ovarian reserve and CD anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, antral follicle count (AFC) and ovarian volüme were evaluated.
Material and methods: The prospective case-controlled study was conducted at a tertiary referral center in Istanbul between March–August 2019. Ovarian functions were evaluated in 50 patients with CD and in 95 healthy women. Serum gonadotropin and AMH levels were determined. AFCs and ovarian volumes were calculated for all subjects.
Results: AMH levels were significantly lower in CD patients (2.1 ± 0.8) compared to the control group (3.3 ± 0.9) (p = 0.001). Serum AMH levels were significantly lower in patients with active CD (2.1 ± 0.6) than the CD patients in remission (2.6 ± 0.8) (p = 0.002). Ovarian volumes and AFC values were significantly lower in both ovaries in CD patients compared to the controls (p < 0.05).
Conclusions: AMH levels, ovarian volume and AFC counts, and thus ovarian reserve was shown to be decreased in CD patients of reproductive age compared to healthy control subjects. Because possible effects of inflammatory damage may be seen in newly diagnosed female CD patients who desire to have a child, we believe that CD patients should be comprehensively assessed for ovarian reserve.

Abstract

Objectives: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a repeating bowel disease characterized by remission and exacerbation periods. The disease mostly affects adults of reproductive age. Women with desires to conceive are concerned about the effects of CD on their fertility. To demonstrate the relationship between ovarian reserve and CD anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, antral follicle count (AFC) and ovarian volüme were evaluated.
Material and methods: The prospective case-controlled study was conducted at a tertiary referral center in Istanbul between March–August 2019. Ovarian functions were evaluated in 50 patients with CD and in 95 healthy women. Serum gonadotropin and AMH levels were determined. AFCs and ovarian volumes were calculated for all subjects.
Results: AMH levels were significantly lower in CD patients (2.1 ± 0.8) compared to the control group (3.3 ± 0.9) (p = 0.001). Serum AMH levels were significantly lower in patients with active CD (2.1 ± 0.6) than the CD patients in remission (2.6 ± 0.8) (p = 0.002). Ovarian volumes and AFC values were significantly lower in both ovaries in CD patients compared to the controls (p < 0.05).
Conclusions: AMH levels, ovarian volume and AFC counts, and thus ovarian reserve was shown to be decreased in CD patients of reproductive age compared to healthy control subjects. Because possible effects of inflammatory damage may be seen in newly diagnosed female CD patients who desire to have a child, we believe that CD patients should be comprehensively assessed for ovarian reserve.

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Keywords

anti-mullerian hormone; crohn disease; inflammatory bowel disease; ovarian reserve

About this article
Title

Ovarian reserve assessment in crohn patients of reproductive age

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 92, No 8 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

550-555

Published online

2021-04-06

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2020.0170

Pubmed

33844252

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2021;92(8):550-555.

Keywords

anti-mullerian hormone
crohn disease
inflammatory bowel disease
ovarian reserve

Authors

Pinar Kadirogullari
Pinar Yalcin Bahat
Fitnat Topbas Selcuki
Kader Irak
Kerem Doga Seckin

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