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The impact of adjuvant treatment with external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy on health-related quality of life in patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma — initial results of a prospective study

Adam Kluska12, Malgorzata Moszynska-Zielinska3, Leszek Zytko3, Natalia Tracz1, Bartlomiej Tomasik4, Anna Stanislawek3, Jolanta Luniewska-Bury1, Jacek Fijuth23, Leszek Gottwald23
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0112
·
Pubmed: 34105737
Affiliations
  1. Department of Brachytherapy, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Radiotherapy, Chair of Oncology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  3. Department of Teleradiotherapy, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland
  4. Department of Biostatistics and Translational Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-05-07

Abstract

Objectives: Our study evaluates the impact of adjuvant treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. Material and methods: We assessed HRQL of patients based on the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire, with endometrial cancer specific HRQL module — EORTC QLQ-EN24. From March 2019 to April 2020 we enrolled 20 patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma, qualified for adjuvant treatment after hysterectomy. We compared the scores measured with the questionnaires at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Results: There was a statistically significant decrease in the mean of global health status/quality of life assessed according to the EORTC QLQ-C30 scale, from 62.25 ± 13.12 at the beginning of the adjuvant radiotherapy to 55.85 ± 14.68 at the end of the treatment (p = 0.047). The mean appetite loss score was higher at the onset of the treatment as compared to its value after EBRT, 19.9 ± 27.33 vs 11.6 ± 19.52 (p = 0.043). Similarly to the mean constipation score, which was 29.85 ± 30.40 vs 11.6 ± 19.52 (p = 0.013). The mean diarrhoea symptom scale increased from 16.55 ± 20.16 to 56.75 ± 36.10 (p = 0.001). In the EORTC QLQ-EN24 scales, gastrointestinal symptoms scores were higher at the end of the treatment, (with the mean of 26.45 ± 22.76) as compared to 14.30 ± 16.52 at the beginning of EBRT (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Patients who receive adjuvant radiotherapy have decreased quality of life during the treatment reporting more serious gastrointestinal symptoms. The potential risk of treatment-related toxicity should be taken into account during the treatment planning process in order to minimize the deterioration of HRQL.

Abstract

Objectives: Our study evaluates the impact of adjuvant treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) combined with vaginal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. Material and methods: We assessed HRQL of patients based on the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire, with endometrial cancer specific HRQL module — EORTC QLQ-EN24. From March 2019 to April 2020 we enrolled 20 patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma, qualified for adjuvant treatment after hysterectomy. We compared the scores measured with the questionnaires at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Results: There was a statistically significant decrease in the mean of global health status/quality of life assessed according to the EORTC QLQ-C30 scale, from 62.25 ± 13.12 at the beginning of the adjuvant radiotherapy to 55.85 ± 14.68 at the end of the treatment (p = 0.047). The mean appetite loss score was higher at the onset of the treatment as compared to its value after EBRT, 19.9 ± 27.33 vs 11.6 ± 19.52 (p = 0.043). Similarly to the mean constipation score, which was 29.85 ± 30.40 vs 11.6 ± 19.52 (p = 0.013). The mean diarrhoea symptom scale increased from 16.55 ± 20.16 to 56.75 ± 36.10 (p = 0.001). In the EORTC QLQ-EN24 scales, gastrointestinal symptoms scores were higher at the end of the treatment, (with the mean of 26.45 ± 22.76) as compared to 14.30 ± 16.52 at the beginning of EBRT (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Patients who receive adjuvant radiotherapy have decreased quality of life during the treatment reporting more serious gastrointestinal symptoms. The potential risk of treatment-related toxicity should be taken into account during the treatment planning process in order to minimize the deterioration of HRQL.

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Keywords

health-related quality of life; endometrial carcinoma; endometrioid; radiotherapy

About this article
Title

The impact of adjuvant treatment with external beam radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy on health-related quality of life in patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma — initial results of a prospective study

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-05-07

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0112

Pubmed

34105737

Keywords

health-related quality of life
endometrial carcinoma
endometrioid
radiotherapy

Authors

Adam Kluska
Malgorzata Moszynska-Zielinska
Leszek Zytko
Natalia Tracz
Bartlomiej Tomasik
Anna Stanislawek
Jolanta Luniewska-Bury
Jacek Fijuth
Leszek Gottwald

References (19)
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