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Published online: 2021-07-15
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The clinical features of hepatitis B virus infection and intrahepatic cholestasis in pregnancy

Hong Wei, Chong Zhang, Jun Meng, Zhi-Qiang Zhao, Qiu-Mei Pang
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0109
·
Pubmed: 34263920

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-07-15

Abstract

Objectives: This article aimed to explore the relationship between hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) and intrahepatic cholestasis in pregnancy (ICP).

Material and methods: We conducted a retrospective study at the Beijing Youan Hospital in China between January 1, 2010 and November 31, 2016. In total, 217 pregnancies were identified and retrospectively studied. Characteristics, pregnant outcomes and the rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HBV were compared between groups.

Results: Elevate of total bile acid occurred mainly during the second and third trimester among HBV with ICP (HBV + ICP) patients. The rate of preterm birth occurred more frequently in HBV + ICP patients than both ICP and HBV patients (p < 0.05). Furthermore HBV + ICP patients had a higher percentage of cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage Apgar < 7 at 1/5 min, AFIII and LBWI rate than HBV patients (p > 0.05) but did not have an increased incidence of fetal loss or birth defect when compared with that in HBV and ICP patients (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: HBV + ICP patients have adverse pregnant outcomes and as a high occurrence in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy monitoring should be enhanced at this time.

Abstract

Objectives: This article aimed to explore the relationship between hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) and intrahepatic cholestasis in pregnancy (ICP).

Material and methods: We conducted a retrospective study at the Beijing Youan Hospital in China between January 1, 2010 and November 31, 2016. In total, 217 pregnancies were identified and retrospectively studied. Characteristics, pregnant outcomes and the rate of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HBV were compared between groups.

Results: Elevate of total bile acid occurred mainly during the second and third trimester among HBV with ICP (HBV + ICP) patients. The rate of preterm birth occurred more frequently in HBV + ICP patients than both ICP and HBV patients (p < 0.05). Furthermore HBV + ICP patients had a higher percentage of cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage Apgar < 7 at 1/5 min, AFIII and LBWI rate than HBV patients (p > 0.05) but did not have an increased incidence of fetal loss or birth defect when compared with that in HBV and ICP patients (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: HBV + ICP patients have adverse pregnant outcomes and as a high occurrence in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy monitoring should be enhanced at this time.

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Keywords

HBV; ICP; pregnancy

About this article
Title

The clinical features of hepatitis B virus infection and intrahepatic cholestasis in pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-07-15

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0109

Pubmed

34263920

Keywords

HBV
ICP
pregnancy

Authors

Hong Wei
Chong Zhang
Jun Meng
Zhi-Qiang Zhao
Qiu-Mei Pang

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