open access

Vol 91, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-02-28
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Can coffee consumption be used to accelerate the recovery of bowel function after cesarean section? Randomized prospective trial

Sezen Bozkurt Koseoglu, Melike Korkmaz Toker, Ismail Gokbel, Ozgu Celikkol, Kemal Gungorduk
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2020.0014
·
Pubmed: 32141054
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(2):85-90.

open access

Vol 91, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-02-28

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate whether coffee consumption accelerates the recovery of bowel function after cesarean section or not.
Material and methods: This study was designed as randomized controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one
of two groups: Ultimately, Group 1 (n = 51) was the study group and drank three cups of coffee after cesarean, whereas
group 2 (n = 52) was not given any treatment. The primary outcome measure was the time to first defecation after surgery,
the secondary outcomes were time to first bowel movement, passage of flatus, time to toleration of a solid diet, additional
antiemetic and analgesic requirement.
Results: There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups. The mean time to passage
of first flatus was significantly shorter in the study group than the control group (8.6 ± 3.3 h vs 11.3 ± 7.5 h, respectively;
p = 0.022). First defecation was 20.7 ± 11.5 h for the study group and at 29.1 ± 14.3 h for the control group (p = 0.001). In
addition, there was a significant difference in mean time to toleration of solid food between the study and control groups
(8.78 ± 2.33 h vs 12.88 ± 4.2.60 h, respectively; p < 0.001).
Conclusions: Coffee can be used in patients to enhance the recovery of gastrointestinal function after elective cesarean
section.

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate whether coffee consumption accelerates the recovery of bowel function after cesarean section or not.
Material and methods: This study was designed as randomized controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one
of two groups: Ultimately, Group 1 (n = 51) was the study group and drank three cups of coffee after cesarean, whereas
group 2 (n = 52) was not given any treatment. The primary outcome measure was the time to first defecation after surgery,
the secondary outcomes were time to first bowel movement, passage of flatus, time to toleration of a solid diet, additional
antiemetic and analgesic requirement.
Results: There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups. The mean time to passage
of first flatus was significantly shorter in the study group than the control group (8.6 ± 3.3 h vs 11.3 ± 7.5 h, respectively;
p = 0.022). First defecation was 20.7 ± 11.5 h for the study group and at 29.1 ± 14.3 h for the control group (p = 0.001). In
addition, there was a significant difference in mean time to toleration of solid food between the study and control groups
(8.78 ± 2.33 h vs 12.88 ± 4.2.60 h, respectively; p < 0.001).
Conclusions: Coffee can be used in patients to enhance the recovery of gastrointestinal function after elective cesarean
section.

Get Citation

Keywords

caffeine; coffee; ileus; cesarean section

About this article
Title

Can coffee consumption be used to accelerate the recovery of bowel function after cesarean section? Randomized prospective trial

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 2 (2020)

Pages

85-90

Published online

2020-02-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2020.0014

Pubmed

32141054

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(2):85-90.

Keywords

caffeine
coffee
ileus
cesarean section

Authors

Sezen Bozkurt Koseoglu
Melike Korkmaz Toker
Ismail Gokbel
Ozgu Celikkol
Kemal Gungorduk

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