open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-09-28
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Does endocan level increase in women with polycystic ovary syndrome? A case — control study

Ilhan Bahri Delibas1, Omer Erkan Yapca2, Esra Laloglu3
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0085
·
Pubmed: 30318577
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):500-505.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, Turkey
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey
  3. Erzurum Public Health Laboratory, Erzurum, Turkey

open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-09-28

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate endocan levels of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in comparison to healthy women.

Material and methods: A cross-sectional case-control study on 88 patients with PCOS (mean age, 22.06 ± 4.24 years; body mass index [BMI], 23.9 ± 4.74 kg/m2) and 87 age- and BMI-matched healthy women (mean age, 23.71 ± 4.42 years; BMI, 22.15 ± 3.03 kg/m2).

Results: Serum endocan level was significantly higher in PCOS group than control group (540.9 ± 280.3 pg/mL vs. 355.5 ± 233.5 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.001). The presence of polycystic ovary finding on ultrasonography or oligomenorhea did not produce significant effect on serum endocan levels (p > 0.05). In PCOS group, endocan level was negatively correlated with BMI and C-reactive protein level, and positively correlated with high density lipoprotein level (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Blood endocan level is increased in PCOS. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical value of blood endocan level as a marker for the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in patients with PCOS.

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate endocan levels of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in comparison to healthy women.

Material and methods: A cross-sectional case-control study on 88 patients with PCOS (mean age, 22.06 ± 4.24 years; body mass index [BMI], 23.9 ± 4.74 kg/m2) and 87 age- and BMI-matched healthy women (mean age, 23.71 ± 4.42 years; BMI, 22.15 ± 3.03 kg/m2).

Results: Serum endocan level was significantly higher in PCOS group than control group (540.9 ± 280.3 pg/mL vs. 355.5 ± 233.5 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.001). The presence of polycystic ovary finding on ultrasonography or oligomenorhea did not produce significant effect on serum endocan levels (p > 0.05). In PCOS group, endocan level was negatively correlated with BMI and C-reactive protein level, and positively correlated with high density lipoprotein level (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Blood endocan level is increased in PCOS. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical value of blood endocan level as a marker for the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in patients with PCOS.

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Keywords

endocan, polycystic ovary syndrome, inflammation, case-control

About this article
Title

Does endocan level increase in women with polycystic ovary syndrome? A case — control study

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

500-505

Published online

2018-09-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0085

Pubmed

30318577

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):500-505.

Keywords

endocan
polycystic ovary syndrome
inflammation
case-control

Authors

Ilhan Bahri Delibas
Omer Erkan Yapca
Esra Laloglu

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