open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-09-28
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Ocular perfusion pressure and intraocular pressure in pregnant women with severe preeclampsia

Haldun Arpacı1, Yaran Koban1, Abdullah Tok2, Abdullah Beyoğlu2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0087
·
Pubmed: 30318579
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):513-517.
Affiliations
  1. Kafkas University School of Medicine, Kars, Turkey
  2. Kahramanmaras Sutcuimam University School of Medicine, Kahramanmaras, Turkey

open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-09-28

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether severe preeclampsia (SPE) affects intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP).

Material and methods: This prospective and comparative study included 64 pregnant females, allocated into 2 groups as Group 1 (31 pregnant women with SPE) and Group 2 (33 normotensive pregnant women). IOP, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, OPP of all the subjects were measured after 20 weeks of gestation and prior to labor and medical therapy.

Results: The mean IOP values in Group 1 were not significantly different from those of Group 2 (p = 0.528). The mean OPP values in Group 1 were significantly higher than those of Group 2 (p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between IOP and OPP levels. No significant differences were determined between the groups in respect of age, gestational age body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.269, p < 0.219 and p < 0.556 respectively). The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were statistically significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Although high IOP was expected in SPE patients, it was found to be constant. This could have been due to an increase in aqueous humor outflow because of changes occurring in angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors in SPE.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether severe preeclampsia (SPE) affects intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP).

Material and methods: This prospective and comparative study included 64 pregnant females, allocated into 2 groups as Group 1 (31 pregnant women with SPE) and Group 2 (33 normotensive pregnant women). IOP, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, OPP of all the subjects were measured after 20 weeks of gestation and prior to labor and medical therapy.

Results: The mean IOP values in Group 1 were not significantly different from those of Group 2 (p = 0.528). The mean OPP values in Group 1 were significantly higher than those of Group 2 (p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between IOP and OPP levels. No significant differences were determined between the groups in respect of age, gestational age body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.269, p < 0.219 and p < 0.556 respectively). The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were statistically significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Although high IOP was expected in SPE patients, it was found to be constant. This could have been due to an increase in aqueous humor outflow because of changes occurring in angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors in SPE.

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Keywords

severe preeclampsia, intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure

About this article
Title

Ocular perfusion pressure and intraocular pressure in pregnant women with severe preeclampsia

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

513-517

Published online

2018-09-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0087

Pubmed

30318579

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):513-517.

Keywords

severe preeclampsia
intraocular pressure
ocular perfusion pressure

Authors

Haldun Arpacı
Yaran Koban
Abdullah Tok
Abdullah Beyoğlu

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