open access

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-07-31
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Preventing congenital toxoplasmosis — implementation of clinical practice guidelines

Maria Biskupska, Adam Kujawa, Jacek Wysocki
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0066
·
Pubmed: 30091449
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(7):388-392.

open access

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-07-31

Abstract

 Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate obstetric care of pregnant women with regard to prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis. Additionally, we attempted to determine the frequency of markers for past infection with Toxoplasma gondii in order to characterize the current significance of preventive measures in the Polish population.

Material and methods: The analysis of the medical records — pregnancy charts of women who presented for delivery — was performed. Patient age, place of residence, and toxoplasmosis test (or lack of it) were evaluated. Also, further diagnostic management, depending on the serologic result, was investigated.

Results: Out of 670 pregnant women, 628 (93.73%) underwent at least one toxoplasmosis diagnostic test. Out of those, 502 (73%) had a negative result (IgG –, IgM –), and 2 (0.32%) had a positive result (IgG +, IgM +), while history of infection with Toxoplasma gondii was confirmed (IgG +, IgM –) in 124 (19.75%) cases. Repeat testing was required in 183 (29.14%) out of the 628 women.

Conclusions: A high rate of women in whom IgG antibodies were not detected in the first test and a low rate of women who required repeat testing later in pregnancy are noteworthy. Regardless of the healthcare policy, parents should receive reliable information about the nature of the disease and possibilities of prevention, while medical professionals ought to have easy access to research data about the epidemiologic status and recommendations.

Abstract

 Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate obstetric care of pregnant women with regard to prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis. Additionally, we attempted to determine the frequency of markers for past infection with Toxoplasma gondii in order to characterize the current significance of preventive measures in the Polish population.

Material and methods: The analysis of the medical records — pregnancy charts of women who presented for delivery — was performed. Patient age, place of residence, and toxoplasmosis test (or lack of it) were evaluated. Also, further diagnostic management, depending on the serologic result, was investigated.

Results: Out of 670 pregnant women, 628 (93.73%) underwent at least one toxoplasmosis diagnostic test. Out of those, 502 (73%) had a negative result (IgG –, IgM –), and 2 (0.32%) had a positive result (IgG +, IgM +), while history of infection with Toxoplasma gondii was confirmed (IgG +, IgM –) in 124 (19.75%) cases. Repeat testing was required in 183 (29.14%) out of the 628 women.

Conclusions: A high rate of women in whom IgG antibodies were not detected in the first test and a low rate of women who required repeat testing later in pregnancy are noteworthy. Regardless of the healthcare policy, parents should receive reliable information about the nature of the disease and possibilities of prevention, while medical professionals ought to have easy access to research data about the epidemiologic status and recommendations.

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Keywords

obstetric care, prophylaxis, seroprevalence

About this article
Title

Preventing congenital toxoplasmosis — implementation of clinical practice guidelines

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

388-392

Published online

2018-07-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0066

Pubmed

30091449

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(7):388-392.

Keywords

obstetric care
prophylaxis
seroprevalence

Authors

Maria Biskupska
Adam Kujawa
Jacek Wysocki

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