open access

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-07-31
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Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) — do the number of fulfilled diagnostic criteria predict the perinatal outcome?

Julia Zaręba-Szczudlik1, Dominika Pykało-Gawińska1, Anna Stępień2, Cieszymierz Gawiński2, Agnieszka Dobrowolska-Redo1, Aneta Malinowska-Polubiec1, Ewa Romejko-Wolniewicz1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0065
·
Pubmed: 30091448
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(7):381-387.
Affiliations
  1. Second Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Karowa 2, 00-315 Warsaw, Poland
  2. Students’ Scientific Group next to 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, Karowa 2, 00-315 Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-07-31

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to check whether the number of fulfilled diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) had any association with patients’ characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. Material and methods: A total of 756 women with single pregnancies and GDM who gave birth at the 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical University of Warsaw between 01.2013-12.2016 were included in a retrospective analysis. Patients were divided into 2 groups: A - 499 patients diagnosed with GDM on the basis of one diagnostic criterion, B - 257 patients diagnosed with GDM on the basis of more than one diagnostic criterion. Results: Patients from group A had lower pre-pregnancy BMI than those from group B (median 24.9 kg/m2 vs. 26.5 kg/m2, p=0.0003). Women from group A were less frequently treated with insulin than women from group B (19.1% vs. 32.7%; p=0.00002). Group A had lower median OGTT levels than group B (85.9 mg/dL vs. 94.1 mg/dL, p=0,0001; 160.2 mg/dL vs. 197.6 mg/dL, p=0.0001; 144.8 mg/dL vs. 167.0 mg/dL,p=0.0001; respectively). Moreover, in group B the average week of labor was earlier than in group A (mean 38,1 and 38,5 weeks of gestation, p=0,0006). Conclusions: Patients who fulfilled more than one diagnostic criterion for GDM may have worse pregnancy outcome. We think that a number of fulfilled diagnostic criteria for GDM may be an important risk factor for insulin therapy during pregnancy and earlier gestational age at delivery.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to check whether the number of fulfilled diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) had any association with patients’ characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. Material and methods: A total of 756 women with single pregnancies and GDM who gave birth at the 2nd Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical University of Warsaw between 01.2013-12.2016 were included in a retrospective analysis. Patients were divided into 2 groups: A - 499 patients diagnosed with GDM on the basis of one diagnostic criterion, B - 257 patients diagnosed with GDM on the basis of more than one diagnostic criterion. Results: Patients from group A had lower pre-pregnancy BMI than those from group B (median 24.9 kg/m2 vs. 26.5 kg/m2, p=0.0003). Women from group A were less frequently treated with insulin than women from group B (19.1% vs. 32.7%; p=0.00002). Group A had lower median OGTT levels than group B (85.9 mg/dL vs. 94.1 mg/dL, p=0,0001; 160.2 mg/dL vs. 197.6 mg/dL, p=0.0001; 144.8 mg/dL vs. 167.0 mg/dL,p=0.0001; respectively). Moreover, in group B the average week of labor was earlier than in group A (mean 38,1 and 38,5 weeks of gestation, p=0,0006). Conclusions: Patients who fulfilled more than one diagnostic criterion for GDM may have worse pregnancy outcome. We think that a number of fulfilled diagnostic criteria for GDM may be an important risk factor for insulin therapy during pregnancy and earlier gestational age at delivery.

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Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus, oral glucose tolerance test, body mass index, insulin therapy

About this article
Title

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) — do the number of fulfilled diagnostic criteria predict the perinatal outcome?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

381-387

Published online

2018-07-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0065

Pubmed

30091448

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(7):381-387.

Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus
oral glucose tolerance test
body mass index
insulin therapy

Authors

Julia Zaręba-Szczudlik
Dominika Pykało-Gawińska
Anna Stępień
Cieszymierz Gawiński
Agnieszka Dobrowolska-Redo
Aneta Malinowska-Polubiec
Ewa Romejko-Wolniewicz

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