open access

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-04-30
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Demographic factors determining folic acid supplementation in pregnant and childbearing age women

Grażyna Kurzawińska12, Justyna Magiełda1, Anna Romała1, Joanna Bartkowiak-Wieczorek3, Magdalena Barlik12, Krzysztof Drews12, Marcin Ożarowski45, Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz12
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0036
·
Pubmed: 29781077
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(4):212-217.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  2. Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  3. Laboratory of Experimental Pharmacogenetics, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Biopharmacy, University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  4. Department of Pharmacology and Phytochemistry, Institute of Natural Fibers and Medicinal Plants, Poznan, Poland
  5. Department of Pharmaceutical Botany and Plant Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-04-30

Abstract

Objectives: Adequate folate intake constitutes a significant problem in the periconceptional period and early pregnancy but can be achieved by folic acid (FA) supplementation. Low intake of folate may cause numerous negative effects on the pregnancy outcome, including recurrent miscarriage, preeclampsia, fetal hypotrophy, premature delivery, premature placental abruption, and intrauterine fetal death. The aim of the study was to evaluate factors determining FA supplementation in the population of Polish women before and during pregnancy.

Material and methods: The study group consisted of 257 women hospitalized postpartum at the Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland. We evaluated folic acid intake considering selected demographic data. A structured questionnaire was used to evaluate folic acid intake before and during pregnancy of the investigated women.

Results: The vast majority of the investigated women (89.1%) took FA during pregnancy. During the pre-pregnancy period, a statistically significantly higher supplementation of folic acid was observed among women with the monthly income level of > 5000 PLN (p = 0.03), and among women who planned their pregnancy as compared to women who did not plan their pregnancy (p < 0.001). During pregnancy, these differences disappeared. A statistically significantly higher number of secundi- and multiparas did not take FA during pregnancy as compared to primiparas (p = 0.008). No correlation between cigarette smoking and FA intake was observed.

Conclusions: Our analysis showed that FA intake increased (by 36.2%) during pregnancy as compared to the pre-pregnancy period, and depended on income, parity, and pregnancy planning.

Abstract

Objectives: Adequate folate intake constitutes a significant problem in the periconceptional period and early pregnancy but can be achieved by folic acid (FA) supplementation. Low intake of folate may cause numerous negative effects on the pregnancy outcome, including recurrent miscarriage, preeclampsia, fetal hypotrophy, premature delivery, premature placental abruption, and intrauterine fetal death. The aim of the study was to evaluate factors determining FA supplementation in the population of Polish women before and during pregnancy.

Material and methods: The study group consisted of 257 women hospitalized postpartum at the Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland. We evaluated folic acid intake considering selected demographic data. A structured questionnaire was used to evaluate folic acid intake before and during pregnancy of the investigated women.

Results: The vast majority of the investigated women (89.1%) took FA during pregnancy. During the pre-pregnancy period, a statistically significantly higher supplementation of folic acid was observed among women with the monthly income level of > 5000 PLN (p = 0.03), and among women who planned their pregnancy as compared to women who did not plan their pregnancy (p < 0.001). During pregnancy, these differences disappeared. A statistically significantly higher number of secundi- and multiparas did not take FA during pregnancy as compared to primiparas (p = 0.008). No correlation between cigarette smoking and FA intake was observed.

Conclusions: Our analysis showed that FA intake increased (by 36.2%) during pregnancy as compared to the pre-pregnancy period, and depended on income, parity, and pregnancy planning.

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Keywords

folate, folic acid (FA), pregnancy, supplementation, demographic factors

About this article
Title

Demographic factors determining folic acid supplementation in pregnant and childbearing age women

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

212-217

Published online

2018-04-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0036

Pubmed

29781077

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(4):212-217.

Keywords

folate
folic acid (FA)
pregnancy
supplementation
demographic factors

Authors

Grażyna Kurzawińska
Justyna Magiełda
Anna Romała
Joanna Bartkowiak-Wieczorek
Magdalena Barlik
Krzysztof Drews
Marcin Ożarowski
Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz

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