open access

Vol 89, No 6 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-06-29
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Changes in the IGF-1 and TNF-α synthesis pathways before and after three-month reduction diet with low glicemic index in women with PCOS

Małgorzata Szczuko1, Marta Zapałowska-Chwyć, Arleta Drozd, Dominika Maciejewska, Andrzej Starczewski, Paweł Wysokiński, Ewa Stachowska
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0051
·
Pubmed: 30010177
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(6):295-303.
Affiliations
  1. Pomorski Uniwersytet Medyczny; Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Broniewsiego 24, 71-460 Szczecin, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 6 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-06-29

Abstract

Objectives: An increase in IGF-I and TNF-α may be a cardioprotective effect. To examine the relationships between IGF-I and TNF-α and test the anthropometric and biochemical parameters before and after a low-glycemic index reduction diet using a correlation matrix.

Material and methods: Twenty-two women diagnosed with PCOS according to Rotterdam’s criteria were eligible for this study, which analysed the results before and after a three months dietary intervention. Body composition measurements were determined by bioimpedance and performed twice, along with the labelling of lipid, carbohydrate and hormonal profiles. IGF-I and TNF-α were also determined in the serum.

Results: Before dietary intervention, a significant correlation was observed. A correlation was also noted between the increase in TNF-α and DHEA-SO4, FSH, glucose level and total cholesterol. The increase in IGF-I was not related to anth­ropometric measurements: however, its concentration was observed to be related to the level of SHBG and HDL. After dietary intervention, the correlation between TNF-α and muscle mass percentage was confirmed, as was the correlation between WHR and fasting blood glucose levels. A significant negative correlation was observed between extracellular water, provided in litres, and SHBG level.

Conclusions: One important role of IGF-I in PCOS pathogenesis is the stimulation of increased synthesis of SHBG and HDL. The increased level of IGF-I after the reduction diet had a cardioprotective effect. TNF-α inhibits FSH synthesis, preventing the growth of numerous follicles. Its synthesis is also related to DHEA-SO4. After three-month reduction diet does not significantly reduce TNF-α.

Abstract

Objectives: An increase in IGF-I and TNF-α may be a cardioprotective effect. To examine the relationships between IGF-I and TNF-α and test the anthropometric and biochemical parameters before and after a low-glycemic index reduction diet using a correlation matrix.

Material and methods: Twenty-two women diagnosed with PCOS according to Rotterdam’s criteria were eligible for this study, which analysed the results before and after a three months dietary intervention. Body composition measurements were determined by bioimpedance and performed twice, along with the labelling of lipid, carbohydrate and hormonal profiles. IGF-I and TNF-α were also determined in the serum.

Results: Before dietary intervention, a significant correlation was observed. A correlation was also noted between the increase in TNF-α and DHEA-SO4, FSH, glucose level and total cholesterol. The increase in IGF-I was not related to anth­ropometric measurements: however, its concentration was observed to be related to the level of SHBG and HDL. After dietary intervention, the correlation between TNF-α and muscle mass percentage was confirmed, as was the correlation between WHR and fasting blood glucose levels. A significant negative correlation was observed between extracellular water, provided in litres, and SHBG level.

Conclusions: One important role of IGF-I in PCOS pathogenesis is the stimulation of increased synthesis of SHBG and HDL. The increased level of IGF-I after the reduction diet had a cardioprotective effect. TNF-α inhibits FSH synthesis, preventing the growth of numerous follicles. Its synthesis is also related to DHEA-SO4. After three-month reduction diet does not significantly reduce TNF-α.

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Keywords

cardioprotective effect, IGF-I, TNF-α, PCOS, reduction diet, glicemic index

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About this article
Title

Changes in the IGF-1 and TNF-α synthesis pathways before and after three-month reduction diet with low glicemic index in women with PCOS

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 6 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

295-303

Published online

2018-06-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0051

Pubmed

30010177

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(6):295-303.

Keywords

cardioprotective effect
IGF-I
TNF-α
PCOS
reduction diet
glicemic index

Authors

Małgorzata Szczuko
Marta Zapałowska-Chwyć
Arleta Drozd
Dominika Maciejewska
Andrzej Starczewski
Paweł Wysokiński
Ewa Stachowska

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