open access

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-07-31
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The value of serum uric acid in predicting adverse pregnancy outcomes of women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy

Jing Lin, Xun-Yu Hong, Rong-Zu Tu
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0064
·
Pubmed: 30091447
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(7):375-380.

open access

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-07-31

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to investigate the clinical value of uric acid in predicting adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) of women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Material and methods: A total of 180 pregnant women with HDP from September 2015 to January 2017 were selected for this study. These subjects were classified into two groups, according to serum uric acid level: high UA group (n = 137) and normal UA group (n = 43). In addition, 180 healthy pregnant women were selected and assigned as the control group (n = 180). The monitored biochemical indices and APOs in these three groups were analyzed. Furthermore, non-conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to determine influencing factors of APOs in women with HDP and hyperuricemia.

Results: The non-conditional multi-factor logistic regression analysis revealed that HUA (SUA > 357 umol/L) is the risk factor of APOs in women with HDP (OR = 1.258, P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Women with HDP and HUA are often accompanied with a variety of abnormal biochemical indicators, and is correlated with the severity of the disease and APOs.

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to investigate the clinical value of uric acid in predicting adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) of women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Material and methods: A total of 180 pregnant women with HDP from September 2015 to January 2017 were selected for this study. These subjects were classified into two groups, according to serum uric acid level: high UA group (n = 137) and normal UA group (n = 43). In addition, 180 healthy pregnant women were selected and assigned as the control group (n = 180). The monitored biochemical indices and APOs in these three groups were analyzed. Furthermore, non-conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to determine influencing factors of APOs in women with HDP and hyperuricemia.

Results: The non-conditional multi-factor logistic regression analysis revealed that HUA (SUA > 357 umol/L) is the risk factor of APOs in women with HDP (OR = 1.258, P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Women with HDP and HUA are often accompanied with a variety of abnormal biochemical indicators, and is correlated with the severity of the disease and APOs.

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Keywords

hyperuricemia,hypertensive disordersof pregnancy, risk factor, perinatal outcomes

About this article
Title

The value of serum uric acid in predicting adverse pregnancy outcomes of women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 7 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

375-380

Published online

2018-07-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0064

Pubmed

30091447

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(7):375-380.

Keywords

hyperuricemia
hypertensive disordersof pregnancy
risk factor
perinatal outcomes

Authors

Jing Lin
Xun-Yu Hong
Rong-Zu Tu

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