open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-03-30
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Importance of polymorphic variants of Tumour Necrosis Factor — α gene in the etiology of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

Agnieszka Kaluba-Skotarczak1, Justyna Magiełda1, Anna Romała1, Grażyna Kurzawińska12, Magdalena Barlik12, Krzysztof Drews12, Marcin Ożarowski34, Tomasz Łoziński5, Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz12
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0027
·
Pubmed: 29664552
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(3):160-168.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  2. Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  3. Department of Pharmacology and Phytochemistry, Institute of Natural Fibers and Medicinal Plants, Poznan, Poland, Poznan, Poland
  4. Department of Pharmaceutical Botany and Plant Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland, Poznan, Poland
  5. Department of Obstetrics, Specialist Hospital Pro-Familia in Rzeszow, Rzeszow, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-03-30

Abstract

Objectives: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is one of the main global causes of increased perinatal mortality and fetal and neonatal morbidity. It remains a key challenge for modern perinatal medicine. Negative effects of IUGR are manifested not only in the perinatal period but also at the later stages of life. Proinflammatory cytokines and their polymorphisms are hypothesized to play an important role in IUGR pathomechanisms. The aim of the study was to determine the role of selected polymorphisms (-238G >A, -308G >A and -376G >A) of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the etiology of intrauterine growth restriction.

Material and methods: The study included 120 patients with IUGR (mean age 30.32, mean gestational age 36.34 gestational weeks) and 135 healthy pregnant women (mean age 31.63, average week of delivery 38.76). The investigated polymorphisms were determined by PCR/RFLP methods.

Results: Higher frequency of TNF-α mutated allele -308A was found in a subgroup of women whose pregnancy en­ded < 37 weeks (18.5 vs. 12.2% in control , OR = 1.63, p = 0.09) and in the subgroup of women with a score ≥ 3 UAS (20.6 vs. 12.2% in control , OR = 1.86, p = 0.06). Heterozygous genotype -308GA was associated with at least 3 times greater risk of three or four abnormalities in uterine arteries score (41.2 vs. 20.0 in control, OR = 2.80, p = 0.01).

Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that the -308G >A TNF-α gene variant may play a role in the etiology of IUGR in the Polish population, but further studies on larger groups are needed

Abstract

Objectives: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is one of the main global causes of increased perinatal mortality and fetal and neonatal morbidity. It remains a key challenge for modern perinatal medicine. Negative effects of IUGR are manifested not only in the perinatal period but also at the later stages of life. Proinflammatory cytokines and their polymorphisms are hypothesized to play an important role in IUGR pathomechanisms. The aim of the study was to determine the role of selected polymorphisms (-238G >A, -308G >A and -376G >A) of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the etiology of intrauterine growth restriction.

Material and methods: The study included 120 patients with IUGR (mean age 30.32, mean gestational age 36.34 gestational weeks) and 135 healthy pregnant women (mean age 31.63, average week of delivery 38.76). The investigated polymorphisms were determined by PCR/RFLP methods.

Results: Higher frequency of TNF-α mutated allele -308A was found in a subgroup of women whose pregnancy en­ded < 37 weeks (18.5 vs. 12.2% in control , OR = 1.63, p = 0.09) and in the subgroup of women with a score ≥ 3 UAS (20.6 vs. 12.2% in control , OR = 1.86, p = 0.06). Heterozygous genotype -308GA was associated with at least 3 times greater risk of three or four abnormalities in uterine arteries score (41.2 vs. 20.0 in control, OR = 2.80, p = 0.01).

Conclusions: The obtained results suggest that the -308G >A TNF-α gene variant may play a role in the etiology of IUGR in the Polish population, but further studies on larger groups are needed

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Keywords

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), pregnancy, genetic polymorphism

About this article
Title

Importance of polymorphic variants of Tumour Necrosis Factor — α gene in the etiology of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

160-168

Published online

2018-03-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0027

Pubmed

29664552

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(3):160-168.

Keywords

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)
tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)
pregnancy
genetic polymorphism

Authors

Agnieszka Kaluba-Skotarczak
Justyna Magiełda
Anna Romała
Grażyna Kurzawińska
Magdalena Barlik
Krzysztof Drews
Marcin Ożarowski
Tomasz Łoziński
Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz

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