open access

Vol 89, No 5 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-05-30
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Sequential sonographic features in neonatal renal vein thrombosis

Aleksandra Mikołajczak1, Anna Tytkowska2, Agata Jaworska2, Alicja Wesołowska2, Maria Katarzyna Borszewska-Kornacka3, Renata Bokiniec3
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0046
·
Pubmed: 30084479
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(5):271-275.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Neonatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
  2. Students Scientific Group affiliated to Department of Neonatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Zwirki i Wigury 63, 02-091 Warsaw, Poland
  3. Neonatal and Intensive Care Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Karowa 2, 00-315 Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 5 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-05-30

Abstract

Objectives: Renal vein thrombosis in newborns is a rare but serious and acute disease. Clinical representations of RVT can vary from discrete symptoms to life-threatening conditions. Therefore imaging, and in particular sonography, plays an important role in the diagnosis of RVT in neonates. Gray-scale, color and spectral/power Doppler ultrasound are all used in the diagnosis of RVT.

Material and methods: We present retrospective sequential ultrasonic imaging of three patients (two term and one preterm infant) with findings characteristic of RVT.

Results: Initial ultrasound diagnostic features include: renal enlargement, echogenic medullary streaks, lack of the flow pattern characteristic of arcuate vessels and subsequently loss of corticomedullary differentiation, reduced echogenicity around pyramids and echogenic band at the extreme apex of the pyramid. Higher resistance index or less pulsatile venous flow on the affected kidney are helpful Doppler signs.

Conclusions: Knowledge and identification of specific features of each phase of the evolution of RTV seems essential to prompt diagnosis. We would like to highlight the evolution of specific sonographic features in each subsequent phase of RVT.

Abstract

Objectives: Renal vein thrombosis in newborns is a rare but serious and acute disease. Clinical representations of RVT can vary from discrete symptoms to life-threatening conditions. Therefore imaging, and in particular sonography, plays an important role in the diagnosis of RVT in neonates. Gray-scale, color and spectral/power Doppler ultrasound are all used in the diagnosis of RVT.

Material and methods: We present retrospective sequential ultrasonic imaging of three patients (two term and one preterm infant) with findings characteristic of RVT.

Results: Initial ultrasound diagnostic features include: renal enlargement, echogenic medullary streaks, lack of the flow pattern characteristic of arcuate vessels and subsequently loss of corticomedullary differentiation, reduced echogenicity around pyramids and echogenic band at the extreme apex of the pyramid. Higher resistance index or less pulsatile venous flow on the affected kidney are helpful Doppler signs.

Conclusions: Knowledge and identification of specific features of each phase of the evolution of RTV seems essential to prompt diagnosis. We would like to highlight the evolution of specific sonographic features in each subsequent phase of RVT.

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Keywords

neonate, renal vein thrombosis, ultrasound, Doppler imaging

About this article
Title

Sequential sonographic features in neonatal renal vein thrombosis

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 5 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

271-275

Published online

2018-05-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0046

Pubmed

30084479

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(5):271-275.

Keywords

neonate
renal vein thrombosis
ultrasound
Doppler imaging

Authors

Aleksandra Mikołajczak
Anna Tytkowska
Agata Jaworska
Alicja Wesołowska
Maria Katarzyna Borszewska-Kornacka
Renata Bokiniec

References (11)
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  8. Lau KK, Stoffman JM, Williams S, et al. Canadian Pediatric Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis: review of the English-language literature between 1992 and 2006. Pediatrics. 2007; 120(5): e1278–e1284.
  9. Wright NB, Blanch G, Walkinshaw S, et al. Antenatal and neonatal renal vein thrombosis: new ultrasonic features with high frequency transducers. Pediatr Radiol. 1996; 26(9): 686–689.
  10. Hilario Barrio A, Gallego Herrero C, Miralles Molina M, et al. [Neonatal renal vein thrombosis: early diagnosis using Doppler ultrasonography and long-term sequelae]. Radiologia. 2009; 51(6): 583–590.
  11. Moudgil A. Renal venous thrombosis in neonates. Curr Pediatr Rev. 2014; 10(2): 101–106.

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